Local

Home featured on Extreme Home Makeover can no longer serve its original purpose

The Martinez family have been the talk of the town for the past 14 years. ABC’s Extreme Home Makeover moved to Albuquerque and built a new home for the Martinez family. They are known for opening their doors to homeless people living in the “War Zone.” “Someone from the church here in the city voted for us and discovered some of the work we do,” said Liesa Reece (formerly Martinez). Within a week, the show was building a family new home with a homeless shelter in the middle of one of the busiest in the city. The exhibition also demolished 10 houses that were condemned and now new low-rise housing has been built. “I have to believe that even if we help change one person’s life, it becomes his or her value,” Reece said. But the dream of changing the neighborhood is over. In 2012 a tragedy struck the family, Reece Gerald’s husband, who started the project, died of cancer. “Before he died, Gerald even said that this does not work. We are used. Where we give a lot of opportunities,” Reece said. Reece says crime and homelessness have worsened since before her husband’s death. “Some of the people we help the most are the oppressors. They get the right that we give them something,” Reece said. After Gerald’s death, Reece stopped building homeless homes in her estate. She said the area around her was not comfortable. “Absolutely. Absolutely. Nothing bad has ever been done,” Reece said. Near Reece’s house there is a homeless camp. According to a report released by the New Mexico Coalition to End Homelessness, the number of homeless people on the streets of Albuquerque has increased by 33 percent since 2013, a year after Gerald’s death. “Homelessness is very good. Our calculations are endless. “As you can probably guess, we didn’t find anyone doing the calculations,” said Hank Hughes. Hughes is the organisation’s executive director for ending homelessness, which conducts homelessness surveys every year. “I think they’re going to keep going for a while,” Hughes said. The problem was so serious that the city’s waste ministry was clearing homeless camps far from Reece’s home. “I have a regular home, you know,” said Blue, a homeless man. Blue has lived near Reece’s home for 13 years, saying his camp is relocated weekly, but he continues to return. “You put me in one place – a football field, something like that,” Blue said. Reece is now using more space in her home for weddings. But she still wants to find a solution to her husband’s problem. “It simply came to our notice then. And I want to be a part of that something. Whatever happens, it does not work, ”said Reece.

The Martinez family have been the talk of the town for the past 14 years.

ABC’s Extreme Home Makeover moved to Albuquerque and built a new home for the Martinez family.

They are known for opening the door to the homeless living in the “War Zone.”

“We were elected by a church in this town, and they discovered some of our work,” said Liesa Reece (formerly Martinez).

Within a week, the show was building a family new home with a homeless shelter in the middle of one of the busiest in the city.

The exhibition also demolished 10 houses that were condemned and now new low-rise housing has been built.

“I have to believe that even if we help change one person’s life, that should be appropriate,” Reece said.

But the dream of changing neighborhoods is over.

In 2012 a tragedy struck the family, Reece Gerald’s husband, who started the project, died of cancer.

“Before he died, Gerald even said that this does not work. We are used. Where we give a lot of opportunities,” Reece said.

Reece says crime and homelessness have worsened since before her husband’s death.

Reece said: “Some of the people we help the most are the most violent.

After Gerald’s death, Reece stopped building homeless homes in her estate.

She said the area around her was not comfortable.

“Absolutely. Absolutely. Nothing bad has ever been done,” Reece said.

Near Reece’s house there is a homeless camp.

According to a report released by the New Mexico Coalition to End Homelessness, the number of homeless people on the streets of Albuquerque has increased by 33 percent since 2013, a year after Gerald’s death.

“Homelessness is very good. Our calculations are endless. “As you can probably guess, we didn’t find anyone doing the calculations,” said Hank Hughes.

Hughes is the executive director of the Homeless Endowment Group, which conducts homeless research every year.

“I think they’re going to keep going for a while,” Hughes said.

The problem was so serious that the city’s waste ministry was clearing homeless camps far from Reece’s home.

“I have a regular home, you know,” said Blue, a homeless man.

Blue has lived near Reece’s home for 13 years, saying his camp is relocated weekly, but he continues to return.

“You put me in one place – a football field, something like that,” Blue said.

Reece is now using more space in her home for weddings.

But she still wants to find a solution to her husband’s problem.

“It simply came to our notice then. And I want to be a part of that something. Whatever happens, it does not work, ”said Reece.

Home featured on Extreme Home Makeover can no longer serve its original purpose Source link Home featured on Extreme Home Makeover can no longer serve its original purpose

Related Articles

Back to top button