California

Heart attacks in Democrat-voting southern California jumped 53% following in the 2020 US Election

Heart attacks in Democratic voters in Southern California came in with 53 percent after the 2020 U.S. presidential election, a study says.

But in Northern California – where nearly half of the counties voted for Trump – they stood with a lower 32 percent.

Researchers at Kaiser Permanente – the largest health care system in the state – screened hospitals for heart problems among 6.4 million patients over a five-day period two weeks before the election. They then followed permits for five days immediately after ballot papers were issued.

Southern California also had larger surges in heart failure – where the muscle stops pumping efficiently – and stroke rates compared to its northern neighbor.

Researchers accuse ‘anger’ and ‘hostility’ amid the narrow results for the rise, warning stress could provoke heart problems.

But they warned that other factors such as Covid and extreme weather may have also hampered the rise in permits.

To manage stress during elections, they suggested that Americans should meditate, do yoga and practice ‘mindfulness’.

The graph above shows the percentage change in cardiovascular events over five days two weeks before the 2020 presidential election to the five days immediately after voting. It breaks it down into Southern California, which supported Biden the most, and Northern California, which mostly supported Trump

The map above shows which president each California county supported in 2020. In the south, nine out of ten Biden supported, but in the north, 22 of the 46 voted for Trump

For years, scientists have pointed to a link between the US presidential election and the rise in heart attacks.

They largely blame the stress caused by ballots and expectations around the results for the rise in rates. Stress is known to increase the risk of heart problems.

The 2020 presidential election was a close affair, with Republicans quickly calling for a recount in several states over accusations of voting and displacement.

Can high stress levels cause heart problems?

Their is now a consensus among cardiologists that stress can lead to heart problems.

Professor Glenn Levine, a medical expert at Baylor College in Texas, said: ‘There is now very good data that psychological stress and stressful events are associated with an increased risk of cardiac events.

‘Studies emphasize the connection between the mind and the heart … and the importance of recognizing that psychological health and distress can affect heart health.’

Today’s study found that heart attacks in the five days after the election ticked 42 percent in California, compared to the same period two weeks before.

Scientists said that ‘anger’ and ‘hostility’ during this period over the close results could explain the rise.

Stress is considered a risk factor for heart problems.

In the study – published Wednesday in the journal JAMA Network Open – Scientists looked at hospital admission rates for heart problems on October 21 to 25, nine days before the election.

This was compared to November 4 to 8, just after the election and over the period in which the results were contested before a winner was declared on November 7.

Kaiser Permanente’s network is the largest in California, covering 20 percent of the people in the southern region and 30 percent in the northern region.

The majority of patients were between 18 and 54 years old (62 percent).

They were equally divided between male and female, and more than 40 percent were white.

The health system did not record for which candidate their patients voted.

But in Southern California, nine of the ten counties supported Biden, while in the north 22 of the 46 voted for Trump.

Southern California’s hospitalization for heart attacks was 141 per 100,000 person-weeks in the week before the election. But over the next five days, it went up to 216 per 100,000.

By comparison, in Northern California, the rate rose from 145 to 192 per 100,000.

For heart failure, hospital admissions rates in Southern California went from 245 to 293, up 19 percent.

Strokes in the region are up 14 percent, from 346 to 396 per 100,000.

In Northern California, heart rate rates rose from 216 to 252, up 16 percent, but stroke rates fell from 246 to 205, down 17 percent.

It was generally found that white men in their 70s were most at risk of suffering a heart problem after the election.

Researchers, led by Dr. Matthew Mefford, an epidemiologist for cardiovascular disease at Kaiser, warned emotions such as ‘anger and hostility’ were associated with ‘new and recurrent heart disease’, as well as premature development on CVD.

‘In addition, anxiety is often linked to CVD risk factors that accelerate atherosclerosis (risk factor for heart attacks).’

They said: ‘Before the 2020 election and several days after that, there were claims of widespread voter fraud, various timelines for counting and reporting postal and personal ballot papers, shifting ballot papers, and speculation that results would not be recognized. by one of the presidential candidates.

‘Although speculative, it is plausible that these factors combined created an emotionally charged atmosphere in the US, regardless of demographic or political affiliation.’

The scientists did not say why stroke rates rose in one region and fell in another.

The graph above shows hospitalizations of all heart problems in California before (control window) and after (gray window) the election. The average (black line) is shown to increase by 17 percent over this period

The graph above shows hospitalizations of all heart problems in California before (control window) and after (gray window) the election. The average (black line) is shown to increase by 17 percent over this period

The graph above shows average hospitalizations of heart attacks (black line) over the period before (control window) and after (risk window) the US election. It shows an uptick of 40 percent, according to researchers at Kaiser Permanente

The graph above shows average hospitalizations of heart attacks (black line) over the period before (control window) and after (risk window) the US election. It shows an uptick of 40 percent, according to researchers at Kaiser Permanente

The graph above shows the average rate of heart failure (black line) both before (control window) and immediately after (risk window) the US election. Scientists say rates in the state rose by 18 percent between the two periods

The graph above shows the average rate of heart failure (black line) both before (control window) and immediately after (risk window) the US election. Scientists say rates in the state rose by 18 percent between the two periods

The graph above shows the average stroke rate (black line) before (control window) and after (risk window) the US presidential election in 2020. It appears that they have increased by two percent

The graph above shows the average stroke rate (black line) before (control window) and after (risk window) the US presidential election in 2020. It appears that they have increased by two percent

She added that concern about the Covid pandemic ‘cannot be ruled out’ in contributing to higher rates of heart problems.

But noted that any stress of this risk occurred over a ‘much broader and longer period’, meaning that it is unlikely to explain the sudden spike.

Severe weather, such as flooding rain and wildfires, could also have contributed to the rise in heart problems, they said.

The results are consistent with a separate paper from around the 2016 presidential election, which also found a peak in heart problems after Trump won.

This found that heart problems rose 62 percent in the state within the two days after the announcement of victory.

A separate paper from North Carolina – which supported Trump in 2016 – showed that heart attacks rose 77 percent in the six weeks after the election.

Heart attacks in Democrat-voting southern California jumped 53% following in the 2020 US Election Source link Heart attacks in Democrat-voting southern California jumped 53% following in the 2020 US Election

Related Articles

Back to top button