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Growing share of COVID-19 deaths are among vaccinated people

Since the COVID-19 vaccine was widespread, there has been a significant gap in deaths between vaccinated and non-vaccinated people. so much so that the diffuse variants carry weight, immunosuppressive protection and enhanced immune function. has become a common occurrence in recent months, putting vulnerable populations at high risk of death or injury while many variables continue to spread. This seems to be especially true for seniors in the United States, who are among the first to receive a first-line immunization list. In the second half of September – wave length – less than one-fourth of COVID-19 deaths. in people who were vaccinated, federal data showed. But in January and February, in the omicron population, more than 40% of COVID-19 deaths occurred among people who had been vaccinated. The COVID-19 vaccine has saved millions of lives in the United States since the first shots were fired in December 2020, and they have not yet been vaccinated and could still be hospitalized or die more. people who have been vaccinated at least two doses of Moderna or Pfizer / BioNTech mRNA or one dose of Johnson & Johnson vaccine. Of those vaccinated who died as a result of the COVID-19 outbreak in January and February, less than three percent received stimulants, according to a CNN study from the Centers for Disease Control. and American Diseases. The other two-thirds received only their first series of programs. Overall, the risk of dying from COVID-19 is still five times higher for people who have not been vaccinated than for those who were vaccinated at least in their first series, CDC data show. Significant differences in level of immunization, and: When adjusted for age, people who had been vaccinated with the first series only had a three-fold increased risk of death than those who also had the flu shot. The CDC encourages people to be “up-to-date” on the COVID-19 vaccine – which includes getting developers at the right time – but still defines a person to be “fully vaccinated.” if they get at least their first line of defense. But this week, a senior Biden government official remained. most direct: All adults need a third shot. Vaccination is the best way for people to protect themselves from COVID-19, and protection is more effective with at least three shots, the official said. Some stressed the importance of advocates to save lives, too. “What we have to worry about is getting the upgrades that we need to keep up with the new differences we have, we don’t have unnecessary deaths and hospitalizations.” high risk In the first year of infection, before immunizations are available, the majority of deaths from COVID-19 – more than 80% – are among the elderly 65 years of age. In 2021, especially during the delta climb, the average age of people dying from COVID-19 increased. Less than 60% of those who died in September were 65 or more, according to interim data from the CDC. But 2022 looks like 2020 and the beginning of winter; So far this year, nearly three-quarters of COVID-19 deaths are among the elderly. Studies show that the protective effect of COVID-19 decreases over time. Data from the CDC published in January found that the enhancement was 90% effective in preventing hospitalization when omicron was a major variant. In comparison, getting two shots was 57% effective when it was at least six months after the second shot. Most seniors completed the first series more than a year ago now. And while the rate of growth among the elderly is higher than in other age groups, less than two-thirds of the elderly receive a higher risk of stroke. Now the CDC recommends a second shot for this age group, and the weight is much lower. CNN research CDC data from recent months shows that the risk differences between vaccinated people who are enrolled compared to those who only have the first list are more pronounced in this group of owners wound. little of what happened in January and February in the omicron increase, but still hundreds die every day. Conditions are rising in almost all states right now, and the White House has warned that another hurricane in the fall and winter could cause unrest. 100 million new cases – all of which increase the risk of the worst infection and the worst loss. But experts say we have the tools to make sure the infection does not turn into a disaster. Getting more Americans on the COVID-19 cou ld making a big difference as the country enters autumn and winter, Dr. Peter Marks, director of the FDA’s Center for Biological Research, said Monday. “It’s very important that we try to get half – or at least more than half – of Americans who only received two doses to get this third dose,” he said. could make a difference especially now that we are entering a COVID-19 environment. ”

Since the introduction of COVID-19 vaccine, there has been a significant increase in deaths between vaccinated and unvaccinated people.

But recent COVID deaths are even more pronounced as differences in proliferation, proliferation, immunosuppression and proliferation increase.

Infectious diseases have become commonplace in recent months, putting vulnerable populations at high risk of death or injury while many variants continue to spread. This seems to be especially true for seniors in the United States, who are among the first to receive a first-line immunization list.

In the second half of September – high tide – less than a quarter of COVID-19 deaths occurred among vaccinated people, federal data showed. But in January and February, in the omicron population, more than 40% of COVID-19 deaths were among vaccinated people.

The COVID-19 vaccine has saved millions of lives in the United States since the first vaccine was introduced in December 2020, and those who have not been vaccinated are still more likely to be hospitalized or die. people who have been vaccinated at least two doses of Moderna or Pfizer / BioNTech against mRNA or one dose of Johnson & Johnson vaccine.

But evidence continues to build around the importance of alarm shots.

Of those vaccinated who died as a result of the COVID-19 outbreak in January and February, less than one-third received additional shots, according to a CNN study of data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. American Diseases and Infections. The other two-thirds got only the primary list.

Overall, the risk of death from COVID-19 is still almost five times higher for people who have not been vaccinated than those who were vaccinated at least in their first series, CDC data show.

But there are big differences in level of immunity, too: When adjusted for age, people who were vaccinated with the first series only had a three-fold increased risk of death than those who also received more shots.

The CDC encourages people to be “up-to-date” on the COVID-19 vaccine – which includes getting developers at the right time – but still defines a person to be “fully vaccinated” if they get at least one initial dose of the vaccine. they. .

But this week, a senior Biden government official was adamant: All adults need a third shot.

Vaccination is the best way for people to protect themselves from COVID-19, and protection is more effective with at least three shots, the official said.

Others stressed the importance of developers to save lives, too.

“Almost no one should die in this country from COVID” with new vaccines and appropriate vaccines, Dr. Robert Califf, commissioner of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, said Saturday on CNN.

“What we have to worry about is getting the upgrades that we need to keep updating so with the new variants we have, we don’t have unnecessary deaths and hospitalizations.”

Developers benefit from high-risk real estate

In the first year of the outbreak, before the vaccine is available, the majority of deaths from COVID-19 – more than 80% – are among the elderly 65 years of age.

In 2021, especially during the delta climb, the average age of people dying from COVID-19 increased. Less than 60% of those who died in September were 65 or above, according to preliminary data from the CDC.

But 2022 looks like 2020 and the beginning of winter; So far this year, nearly three-quarters of all COVID-19 deaths are among the elderly.

Studies show that the protective effect of COVID-19 decreases over time. Data from the CDC published in January It was found that the gain was 90% effective in preventing hospitalization during the time when the omicron was the largest. In comparison, getting two shots is 57% effective when it takes at least six months and a second shot.

Most seniors completed their first series more than a year ago now. And while the rate of growth among the elderly is higher than in other age groups, less than two-thirds of the elderly receive a stronger shot.

The CDC is now recommending a second booster shot for this age group, and, taking it even less.

A CNN study of CDC data from recent months shows that the risk differences between people who have been vaccinated are more pronounced compared to those who only have the first series are more prominent in this age group. the weak.

Deaths of COVID-19 can be prevented

The daily death toll of COVID-19 in the United States has fallen to what it was in January and February in the omicron boom, but hundreds are still dying every day.

Crime is on the rise in almost every state right now, and the White House has warned that any unrest in the spring and winter could lead to 100 million new calls – both increase the risk of severe infection and fatal injury.

But experts say we have the tools to make sure the infection doesn’t turn bad.

Finding more Americans about COVID-19 could make a big difference as the country travels in the fall and winter, Dr. Peter Marks, director of the FDA’s Center for Biological Research, said Monday.

“It’s very important that we try to get half – or at least more than half – of Americans who only received two doses to get that third dose,” he said. “That could lead to further differences here, and it could make a difference especially now that we’re entering a COVID-19 environment.”

Growing share of COVID-19 deaths are among vaccinated people Source link Growing share of COVID-19 deaths are among vaccinated people

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