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Grizzly Flats residents grapple with lack of clean drinking water

The Caldor fire almost destroyed the town of Grizzly Flats, destroyed hundreds of homes and put waste in its water distribution system. It creates additional challenges for population growth efforts. Jody Lauser, General Manager of the Grizzly Flats Community Services District, which treats and provides water to the town, said: Miraculously, the treatment plant escaped the flame, but the water from the reservoir it draws still needs to be tested. “There is a lot of damage,” Lauther added. Her team evaluates miles of service lines and meters at hundreds of facilities throughout the city. “We found some intact, some of them burned and damaged in the fire,” Rosa said. Even the pipes buried underground did not escape the flames. “The burning roots of a tree burned a two-foot-deep PVC line, which was a waterline servicing someone’s home,” Lauther added. The Community Services District has only one water tank to hold all of the Grizzly Flats treated water. The other two tanks were lost in the fire. “It’s a pain and I feel very much in our community,” Rosa said. “We are strong, stubborn, resilient and undoubtedly coming back, but now it’s difficult.” Lauther estimates that it will take at least a year for the water distribution system to return to its original location. increase. Before the fire. Prior to Caldor Fire, the community service district served 615 homes. Currently, Rosa says there are about 200 homes left. Those interested in donating bottled water to wildfire survivors are advised to contact the Grizzly Flats Community Services District.

The Caldor fire almost destroyed the town of Grizzly Flats, destroyed hundreds of homes and put waste in its water distribution system. It creates additional challenges for population growth efforts.

Jody Lauser, General Manager of the Grizzly Flats Community Services District, which treats and provides water to the town, said:

Miraculously, the treatment plant escaped the flame, but the water from the reservoir it draws still needs to be tested.

“There is a lot of damage,” Lauther added.

Her team evaluates miles of service lines and meters at hundreds of facilities throughout the city.

“We found some intact, some of them burned and damaged in the fire,” Rosa said.

Even the pipes buried underground did not escape the flames.

“The burning roots of a tree burned a two-foot-deep PVC line, which was a waterline servicing someone’s home,” Lauther added.

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The Community Services District has only one water tank to hold all of the Grizzly Flats treated water. The other two tanks were lost in the fire.

“It’s a pain and I feel very much in our community,” Rosa said. “We are strong, stubborn, resilient and will definitely come back, but now it’s difficult.”

Lauther estimates that it will take at least a year for the water distribution system to return to its pre-fire state. Prior to Caldor Fire, the community service district served 615 homes. Currently, Rosa says there are about 200 homes left.

Those interested in donating bottled water to wildfire survivors are advised to contact the Grizzly Flats Community Services District.

Grizzly Flats residents grapple with lack of clean drinking water Source link Grizzly Flats residents grapple with lack of clean drinking water

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