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Firefighters conduct burnout operations in the Giant Forest

Firefighters fought the fire on Thursday as the flames were heading towards the characteristic grove of ancient giant trees in Sequoia National Park. Burning off flammable plants and other substances using firing operations before a wildfire arrives in a huge forest is a tool for firefighters to turn off, delay, or turn the fire. It’s one of several ways you can use your enemies. Tactics carry considerable risk when circumstances change. However, it is routinely used to protect communities, homes and valuable resources that are currently under fire threat, including some 2,000 giant Sequoia groves, including the world’s largest General Sherman tree. The mechanism is as follows. Fuel is everything. There are three things that affect how hot and fast a fire burns. Weather where the wind and dryness fuel the flames. And fuel, the amount of material that can be burned. The first two are out of control, but there are ways to reduce fuel long before a fire breaks out, or even when one is approaching. Maureen Kennedy, a professor of wildfire ecology at the University of Washington, said: Historically, low to moderate severity fires every 5 to 30 years burned off excess brushes and wood before the deadly fires of the early 20th century, with aggressive fire extinguishing activities and all. This led to the US Forest Department’s policy of curbing fires by 10 am the next day. It led to dead tree jungles, fallen logs and overgrown brushes accumulated over the last century, causing larger fires. Slow down fire by making it For centuries, Native Americans have used fire to thin out forests. Open burning, set in good weather conditions, mimics the low-intensity fires of the past and helps burn excess fuel when there is no risk of getting out of control. If the fire eventually burns the area, it will do so with lower intensity and less damage. The idea is the same for wildfires. Fire chiefs use changes in the wind and landscape to burn the area before a fire breaks out and deprive it of the fuel it needs to continue. “They are trying to achieve the same effect,” Kennedy said. “They are trying to mitigate the behavior of the fire. They are trying to get rid of the fuel that burns the fire very hard. Of course, their goal is to better contain and control the fire and protect more valuable resources. Is to do. ”All wilderness firefighters who set mild fires safely will learn about fire zone operations in basic training, but at a higher level to plan and carry out fire operations. I need training. Former Fire Chief of the National Park Service. Appropriate conditions and sufficient time are required to burn the area between the firebreak and the planned site, such as the firebreak or the giant sequoia forest. You will reach the firebreak built by the firefighters. Often, such operations are performed at night when the temperature and humidity tend to extinguish or slow the fire. Fire convection draws wind from all directions, which helps. Burnout can be set on the other side of the ridge when the fire climbs steep terrain. As a result, embers land in areas where dry grass and brushes are already burning. The firing operation requires the crew to prevent the fire from spreading in the wrong direction. It may also include a bulldozer that cuts the firebreak and an air tanker that drops the retarder to further slow down the flame. “Everything needs to work in sync,” Broyles said. “The air tanker itself won’t put out the fire unless you follow up with the person in charge.” “It’s like an army. It’s not just about bombing hell from enemies without ground forces.” Burnouts are commonly used, but when the wind shifts or doesn’t ignite fast enough, There is a possibility of flashback. “More fire on the ground can be dangerous,” said Rebecca Patterson, a spokeswoman for Sequoia National Park. “It has the potential to cause more problems than it can be solved,” said Mr. Broilles, who sometimes had to evacuate firefighters because of the burnout syndrome. “Fortunately, in my case there was no loss,” he said. A small flame to protect a giant Sequoia firefighter on Thursday According to Patterson, Giant Forest was operating on burnout at a near micro level while moving from tree to tree. A cover of the ground and debris of organic matter called duff near the tree were ignited, and the flame sneaked away from the tree, creating cushioning material. General Sherman and other giant conifers were wrapped in an aluminum blanket to protect them from the extreme heat. The park used open burning for the first time in the west over 50 years ago and regularly burns several orchards to remove fuel. Patterson said that was the reason for optimism. “Hopefully a huge forest will emerge from this intact,” she said.

Firefighters fought the fire on Thursday as the flames were heading towards the characteristic grove of ancient giant trees in Sequoia National Park.

Burning off flammable plants and other substances using firing operations before a wildfire arrives in a huge forest is a tool for firefighters to turn off, delay, or turn the fire. It’s one of several ways you can use your enemies.

Tactics carry considerable risk when circumstances change. However, it is routinely used to protect communities, homes and valuable resources that are currently under fire threat, including some 2,000 giant Sequoia groves, including the world’s largest General Sherman tree.

The mechanism is as follows.

Fuel is everything

There are three things that affect how hot and fast a fire burns. A landscape where the fire burns fast on a steep slope. Weather where the wind and dryness fuel the flames. And fuel, the amount of material that can be burned.

The first two are out of control, but there are ways to reduce fuel long before a fire breaks out, or even when one is approaching.

Maureen Kennedy, a professor of wildfire ecology at the University of Washington, said:

Historically, low to moderate severity fires every 5 to 30 years burned off excess brushes and wood before the deadly fires of the early 20th century, with aggressive fire extinguishing activities and all. This led to the US Forest Department’s policy of curbing fires by 10 am the next day. report.

The result was a jungle of dead trees, fallen logs, and overgrown brushes that had accumulated over the last century, resulting in a larger fire.

Slow down the fire by making it

For centuries, Native Americans have used fire to thin out forests.

Open burning, set in good weather conditions, mimics the low-intensity fires of the past and helps burn excess fuel when there is no risk of getting out of control. If the fire eventually burns the area, it will do so with lower intensity and less damage.

The idea is the same for wildfires. Fire chiefs use changes in the wind and landscape to burn the area before a fire breaks out and deprive it of the fuel it needs to continue.

“They are trying to achieve the same effect,” Kennedy said. “They are trying to mitigate the behavior of the fire. They are trying to get rid of the fuel that burns the fire very hard. Of course, their goal is to better contain and control the fire and protect more valuable resources. Is to do. ”

Set a mild fire safely

All wilderness firefighters learn about burnout with basic training, but a higher level of training is required to plan and perform firing operations.

“Before you light a fire, you need to know how to extinguish it,” said Paul Broiles, a former Fire Chief of the National Park Service.

To burn the area between the firebreak and the projection point, such as the firebreak or the giant forest of Sequoia, it is enough to complete the proper conditions and burnout before the fire reaches the fireline built by the firefighters. I need some time.

Often, such operations are performed at night when the temperature and humidity tend to extinguish or slow the fire.

Fire convection draws wind from all directions, which helps. Burnout can be set on the other side of the ridge when the fire climbs steep terrain. As a result, embers land in areas where dry grass and brushes are already burning.

The firing operation requires the crew to prevent the fire from spreading in the wrong direction. It may also include a bulldozer that cuts the firebreak and an air tanker that drops the retarder to further slow down the flame.

Everything needs to work in sync, according to Broyles.

“The air tanker itself doesn’t put out the fire unless you follow up with the staff,” he said. “It’s like an army. It’s not just about bombing hell from enemies without ground troops.”

Burnout is commonly used, but it can flash back if the wind shifts or is not ignited fast enough.

“More fire on the ground can be dangerous,” said Rebecca Patterson, a spokeswoman for Sequoia National Park. “It has the potential to cause more problems than it solves.”

Mr. Broilles said he had had to evacuate firefighters because the burnout wasn’t in time.

“Fortunately, in my case there was no loss,” he said.

A small flame to protect Sequoia

According to Patterson, firefighters on Thursday had a near-micro-level burnout in the Giant Forest and were moving from tree to tree. The ground cover plants near the trees and debris of organic matter known as duff were burning. And allowed the flames to sneak up from the tree and create a buffer.

General Sherman and other giant conifers were wrapped in aluminum blankets to protect them from extreme heat.

The park used open burning for the first time in the west over 50 years ago and regularly burns several orchards to remove fuel. Patterson said that was the reason for optimism.

“Hopefully a huge forest will emerge from this intact,” she said.

Firefighters conduct burnout operations in the Giant Forest Source link Firefighters conduct burnout operations in the Giant Forest

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