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Film festival focuses on Increasing access to movies, television for people with sensory disabilities

Los Angeles (KABC)-The Mexican Consulate in Los Angeles has launched a year-long film festival aimed at providing more access to people with sensory disabilities through open captions, audio guides, and support from the app.

The kick-off featured Oscar-nominated director Doug Roland. His Oscar-nominated short film “Feeling Through” depicts a real encounter with the deafblind. Its role was played by the deafblind, who are deafblind.

“Really unfortunately, the film industry is currently almost inaccessible. It’s very difficult to get it,” said Mayra Castrejón-Hernández, president of the Deaf Women of Color.

The hearing-impaired Castrejón-Hernández was born in Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico. She later studied at the Wisconsin Deaf School and now leads the Deaf Women of Color, an organization founded to give women access to resources and create solutions.

“I really love black and white classic Mexican movies. Love them. And there are some gestures and how they show emotions and how they convey it on the screen. I see. I think it’s great. But do I understand what they are? “No, because there is no caption,” said Castrejón-Hernández.

She added that she often relies on her siblings or friends to interpret the film for her. The Color Media Arts Project Queerman is one of many organizations that train filmmakers and invest solely in access.

“QWOCMAP is working on audio guides for the entire festival,” said T. Kebo Drew, managing director of QWOCMAP. “At our festival, we only accept films with open captions, we also have ASL interpreters. For digital events, we also have live captions.”

Howard A, CEO of the National Association of the Deaf. Rosenblum told Eyewitness News that the festival was notorious for its inaccessibility. Captions are often not provided. Even if provided, participants will not be able to view the captions due to poor gaze. Thanks to the support of NAD and other groups, Rosenblum said that almost 100% of television broadcasts are captioned.

“But TV commercials often don’t have captions, and network promotions rarely have captions,” Rosenblum said. “The film industry can ensure that all films distributed through theaters and festivals are shown in open and closed captions, which requires no training or investment, but is fully accessible. We need the will of the industry to promise. “

How can individuals and businesses improve access for everyone?

“Are people open-minded? If so, can you understand the other perspectives, that is, the perspectives of the hearing impaired who want to use and access the media? Often they go to other groups. Focus on the hearing impaired, who tend not to do so, “he said.

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Film festival focuses on Increasing access to movies, television for people with sensory disabilities Source link Film festival focuses on Increasing access to movies, television for people with sensory disabilities

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