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Early prison releases hotly debated in CDCR public hearing

LEARN WHO IS RESPONSIBLE. LEGAL ENFORCEMENT AND THE PROPOSED TEACHERS OR LEGISLATORS UNDERSTAND HOW THE CDC RELEASES THEIR EARLY EARLY. CONCERNED ABOUT PUBLIC SECURITY. KCRA 3 KAY RECEDE EXPLAINS WHAT MOVEMENT MEANS. KAY RECE: DE MOTIVATIONS AND PARTICIPATION IN PROGRAMS LIKE FIRE-FIGHTING CAN LEAD EARLY EARLY RELEASE FROM AC SENTIONS TO GUARD. >> WE BELIEVE IT WORKS. OUR EXPERIENCE IS THAT OPERATES AND CHANGES BEHAVIOR AND STRENGTHENS PUBLIC SECURITY. >> MY POSITION IS I THINK IT WOULD BE A DANGEROUS THING TO DO. PRISONERS IN STATE PRISONS ARE ALREADY RELEASED AT A FAST RATE. Y KARECEDE: BRIDGE SAYS THE LATEST SUMMARY OF SACRAMEDO IS AN EXAMPLE OF THE FAILURE OF EXISTING REGULATIONS. SMILEY AAN MARTIN ON FROM THE PERSON COMPLETED FOR PARTICIPATION IN THE MASSURE SHORMENTS OF THE MONTHER IN WNTOWNDO SACRAMENTO RELEASED FROM FEBRUARY FOR GOOD BEHAVIOR IN THE PROPOSAL OF THE MONTH 52.00 WE HAVE PEOPLE TO THE ROAD WHERE RELEASE RELEASE RELEASE WEAPONS AND WE ARE HAPPY TO USE THEM. KAY RECEDE: N OTHER FLIPSIDE, MARKAY TLOR CHERYL’S – SHARES PLANNING WITH PROGRAMS, MOTIVATIONS. >> I DO NOT WANT SOMEONE FROM PRISON WHO IS NOT READY YET TO BE RELEASED. THIS IS NOT WHAT I BELIEVE, I BELIEVE IN THE PERSON WHO HAS DONE THE JOB. KAY RECEDE: TAYLOR ORIGINALLY SENTENCED TO 26 YEARS OF LIFE FOR MURDER. HE WAS RELEASED EARLY FROM PRISON IN 2018 FOR GOOD MOOD. BUT THE PEOPLE HE KNEW AND THE LESSONS HE HAS TAKEN, SAYS EX, REHABILITATION WORK FOR HIM AND COUNTLESS COLLEAGUES. >> THEREFORE, I THINK I HAVE A MORAL RESPONSIBILITY NOW THAT THIS SECOND OPPORTUNITY WAS GIVEN TO ME, TO USE THIS SECOND OPPORTUNITY TO CONTRIBUTE TO MEETING. KAY RECEDE: SAYS HREAS ARE BETTER. HE SAYS FOR EXAMPLE, A 10-YEAR-OLD PENALTY COULD INCREASE ONLY IN THREE YEARS AND FOUR MONTHS, FOR GOOD BEHAVIOR. >> THESE SPECIFIC REGULATIONS THAT WOULD LIKE TO MAKE A PERMANENT ADDITION OF REINFORCED CREDIT RELEASE AT A VERY HIGH LEVEL. KAY RECEDE: KAY RECEDE, KCRA3 NEWS. GULSTAN: The CDC ISSUED A DECLARATION SAYING, IN PART, THE PROPOSED UPDATE REGULATION IN DECEMBER FOR GOOD ACCREDITATIONS. WE APPRECIATE THE COMMITMENT AND THE COMMENTS FROM MEMBERS OF THE PUBLIC AND IN THIS GOOD PROCESS, THE DEPARTMENT CONTINUES CONTINUOUSLY WITH VARIOUS INTERESTS BY THE INTEREST. THEY

The Early Release Debate: Arguments in favor of CDCR public hearings


More than a hundred answering machines shared their concerns and thoughts Thursday during a conference call about possible changes to the California Department of Correction and Rehabilitation (CDCR) that could lead to early release from California jails. The CDCR proposed updated emergency regulations in December 2021, according to which inmates involved in programs such as firefighting and non-violent can be released early. These changes can be made permanent if the CDCR goes ahead. “The only detainees who do not qualify are those who have been sentenced to death or life without parole. We believe it works. Our experience is that it works and changes behavior and enhances public safety,” said Mark Taylor, a Hope and The head of the Northern Regional Redemption Team with the Coalition Against Recidivism, he said. Taylor, on the other hand, shared that, in conjunction with rehabilitation programs, incentives not only work but are necessary when considering early release. “I do not want anyone released from prison who is not yet ready. This is not what I support. “I support the one who has done the job,” Taylor said. Taylor was initially sentenced to 26 years to life in prison for murder. He said he was released early from prison in 2018 after serving 20 and a half years in Pelican Bay for good behavior. The people he met and the lessons he learned helped him and his countless colleagues. He said with a changed mindset, he felt remorse for what had happened and was trying to make up for it. “In a definitive and substantive way,” Taylor said .State Attorney Stanislaus has a different view of early release. “My position is that I think it would be very, very, very dangerous to do. “Prisoners in state prisons are already being released at a very fast pace,” said Birgit Fladager, Stanislaus County District Attorney. Fladager said the shooting in central Sacramento earlier this month was an example of the failure of existing regulations. Smiley Allen Martin, one of the men accused of taking part in the mass attack, was released in February for good behavior because of proposal 57, which passed in 2016. “It is very clear from what happened in Sacramento that we have people on the streets. “They have been released early, they have easy access to weapons and they are happy to use them,” Flandager said. “These specific regulations, which would like to make permanent California has made credit profitability opportunities accessible to eligible incarcerated people for many decades and is increasing the rate of credit gain Promotion of Proposal 57, which was overwhelmingly approved by voters in 20 16, provides an imperative reason for individuals to engage in positive planning while serving their time. This can lead to improved behavior and instill in social and professional / educational skills to help people find success and avoid relapse after incarceration. We greatly appreciate the commitment and feedback from members of the public, and throughout this regulatory process, the department is constantly working with a variety of stakeholders to ensure transparency and communication. and continue to follow the regulatory procedure in accordance with the Law on Administrative Procedure. ”

More than a hundred answering machines shared their concerns and thoughts Thursday during a conference call about possible changes to the California Department of Correction and Rehabilitation (CDCR) that could lead to early release from California jails.

The CDCR proposed updated emergency regulations in December 2021, according to which inmates involved in programs such as firefighting and non-violent can be released early. These changes can be made permanent if the CDCR goes ahead. The only detainees who do not meet the conditions are those who have been sentenced to death or life without parole.

“We believe it works. Our experience is that it works and changes behavior and enhances public safety,” said Mark Taylor, regional director of Hope and Redemption North with the Coalition Against Recidivism.

Taylor, on the other hand, shared that, in conjunction with rehabilitation programs, incentives not only work but are necessary when considering early release.

“I do not want anyone to be released from prison who is not ready yet. This is not what I stand for. “I support the person who has done the job,” said Taylor.

Taylor was initially sentenced to 26 years to life in prison for murder. He said he was released early from prison in 2018 after serving 20 and a half years in Pelican Bay for good behavior.

The people he has met and the lessons he has taken have helped him and his countless colleagues. He said with his changed mentality, he feels remorse for what he has done and is trying to make up for it.

“And for that, I feel I have a moral responsibility, now that I have been given this second chance to use this second opportunity to contribute to my community in a definitive and meaningful way,” Taylor said.

Stanislaus County District Attorney has a different view on early release.

“My position is that I think it would be very, very, very dangerous to do. “Prisoners in state prisons are already being released at a very fast pace,” said Birgit Flandager, Stanislaus County Attorney.

Fladager said the shootings that took place in downtown Sacramento earlier this month are an example of the failure of existing regulations. Smiley Allen Martin, one of the men accused of taking part in the mass attack, was released in February for good behavior because of proposal 57, which passed in 2016.

“It’s very clear from what happened in Sacramento that we have people on the streets who have been released early, who have easy access to weapons and are willing to use them,” Fladager said.

Fladager believes there must be a better way. He said, for example, a 10-year sentence could be commuted to just three years and four months in prison, for good behavior.

“These specific regulations that they would like to perpetuate add improved credit release opportunities at a very high level for very violent and serious criminals,” Fladager said.

The CDCR published this statement in KCRA:

“California has made credit opportunities accessible to eligible incarcerated people for many decades, and the increase in the rate of credit gains to promote Proposal 57, which was overwhelmingly approved by voters in 2016, provides a compelling reason for individuals to participate in positive planning while serving their time. This can lead to improved behavior and instill in the social and professional / educational skills that will help people find success and avoid relapse after imprisonment.

The CDCR proposed updated emergency regulations in December on goodwill appropriations. We greatly appreciate the commitment and feedback from members of the public, and throughout this regulatory process, the department works closely with a variety of stakeholders to ensure transparency and communication.

We will review all the data from the public after the end of the public comment period and we will continue to follow the regulatory procedure in accordance with the law on administrative procedure. “

Early prison releases hotly debated in CDCR public hearing Source link Early prison releases hotly debated in CDCR public hearing

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