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Defense, prosecution rest in sexual misconduct case of celebrity chef Mario Batali

Details in this story and in the video above may bother some. The discretion of the viewer is recommended. The final arguments were presented on Tuesday in Boston in the trial for sexual harassment of the famous chef Mario Batali, who is accused of obscene assault and abuse. Batali, 61, who is accused of forcibly kissing and caressing a woman after taking a selfie with her at a Boylston Street restaurant in 2017, chose a trial in the bench. Batali’s accuser took a stand on Monday and explained what happened the night he saw Batali and took pictures with him at Towne Stove & Spirits. “He had one of his arms around me and his face was pressed against mine,” he said. “He was kissing the side of my face and he had his other hand wrapped around my back, and we see that in the photo,” said the 32-year-old Boston software company as he was taking the photos. Batali’s hands were in ” sensitive areas “and touched her body.” “He kept saying, ‘one more, one more,’ to take another selfie,” the prosecutor testified as the photos appeared in the courtroom. He was standing next to Batali, who was sitting at the bar, taking pictures. “Like, ‘squeezing between my legs, squeezing my vagina to pull me closer to him – as if it were a normal way to grab someone – just between my legs to pull them towards you . ” Batali’s lawyer, Anthony Fuller, argued that the attack never took place and that the prosecutor was not a credible witness and had financial incentives to lie. “He is not telling the truth,” he said. “This is made for money and for fun.” Fuller said the plaintiff has a financial incentive to lie as she seeks more than $ 50,000 in damages from Batalie in a separate civil lawsuit pending in Suffolk County, Boston. During the controversial hearing, he prepared financial statements showing that the woman was eating in Eataly, the Italian market in which Batali once had a stake, weeks after the meeting, and continued to patronize the Boston bar where the alleged attack took place. “Go to the restaurant of the man who claimed you were brutally attacked?” he said. “That does not make sense.” The woman said she did not remember going to Eataly and claimed she was not talking about financial gain. “That night he did not show the alleged attack. The prosecutor said he felt embarrassed until he saw other women coming forward to share similar meetings with Batali.” This happened to me, and this is my life “, the woman answered when the prosecutors asked why she made her appearance. “I want to be in control of what happened, to have my say and for everyone to be held accountable for their actions.” The trial has been delayed due to the COVID-19 pandemic. However, during his 2019 lawsuit, Batali pleaded not guilty to the charges. If convicted, Batali could face up to two and a half years in prison and be forced to register as a sex offender. Several other women have previously reported sexual misconduct by Batali. Batali gave up his daily activities in the empire of his restaurant and the cooking show “The Chew” in December 2017, after four women accused him of inappropriate touch. Batali apologized, acknowledging that the allegations “fit” the way he acted. “I have made many mistakes and I am so sorry that I disappointed my friends, my family, my fans and my team,” he said in an email newsletter at the time. “My behavior was wrong and there are no excuses. I take full responsibility.” Batali opened a branch of the popular Italian Eataly food market in Boston at the Prudential Center in 2016 as well as a Babbo Pizzeria e Enoteca in the Seaport area of ​​the city in 2015. Batali has since bought a stake in Eataly, which still has Dozens of locations around the world, including Boston, and the Babbo restaurant in the city have since closed.

Details in this story and in the video above may bother some. The discretion of the viewer is recommended.

The final arguments were presented Tuesday in Boston at the trial for sexual misconduct of the famous chef Mario Batali, who is accused of obscene assault and assault.

Batali, 61, who is accused of forcibly kissing and caressing a woman after taking a selfie with her at a Boylston Street restaurant in 2017, has won a lawsuit.

Batali’s prosecutor took office on Monday and explained what happened the night he saw Batali and took pictures with him at Towne Stove & Spirits.

“He had one of his arms around me and his face was pressed against mine,” he said. “He kissed the side of my face and had his other hand wrapped around my back, and we see that in the photo.”

The 32-year-old employee of the software company in the Boston area said that while taking the photos, Batali’s hands were in “sensitive areas” and were touching her body.

“He kept saying ‘one more, one more’, to take another selfie,” the prosecutor testified as the photos were displayed in the courtroom.

He said he was standing next to Batali, who was sitting at the bar taking pictures.

“His right hand is over my chest, all over my back, between my legs, grabbing me in a way I have never been touched like that,” he said. “Like squeezing between my legs, squeezing my vagina to pull me closer to him – as if it were a normal way to catch someone – right between my legs to pull him towards you.”

Batali’s lawyer, Anthony Fuller, argued that the attack never took place and that the prosecutor was not a credible witness and had financial incentives to lie.

“He is not telling the truth,” he said. “This is made for money and for fun.”

Fuller said the plaintiff has a financial incentive to lie as she seeks more than $ 50,000 in damages from Batali in a separate civil lawsuit pending in Boston Suffolk County Superior Court.

During the controversy, he presented financial statements showing that the woman was eating in Eataly, the Italian market in which Batali once owned, weeks after the meeting, and continued to protect the Boston bar where the alleged attack took place.

“Are you going to the restaurant of the man who claimed you were brutally attacked?” he said. “That does not make sense.”

The woman said she did not remember going to Eataly and claimed she was not talking about financial gain. He also strongly pushed Fuller to wonder why none of the many photos taken with Batali that night showed the alleged attack.

The prosecutor said she felt embarrassed until she saw other women moving forward to share similar encounters with Batali.

“This happened to me, and this is my life,” the woman replied when prosecutors asked why she had appeared. “I want to be in control of what happened, to give my opinion and to be accountable for their actions.”

The test has been delayed due to the COVID-19 pandemic. However, during his 2019 lawsuit, Batali pleaded not guilty to the charges.

If convicted, Batali could face up to two and a half years in prison and be forced to register as a sex offender.

Several other women have reported Batali sexual misconduct in the past.

Batali resigned from daily activities in his restaurant empire and cooking show “The Chew” in December 2017, after four women accused him of inappropriate touching.

Batali has apologized, acknowledging that the allegations “fit” the way he acted.

“I have made many mistakes and I am so sorry that I disappointed my friends, my family, my fans and my team,” he said in an email newsletter at the time. “My behavior was wrong and there are no excuses. I take full responsibility.”

Batali opened a branch of Eataly’s popular Italian food market in Boston at the Prudential Center in 2016, as well as a Babbo Pizzeria e Enoteca in the Seaport District of the city in 2015.

Batali has since been bought from its stake in Eataly, which still has dozens of locations around the world, including Boston, and the Babbo restaurant in the city has since closed.

Defense, prosecution rest in sexual misconduct case of celebrity chef Mario Batali Source link Defense, prosecution rest in sexual misconduct case of celebrity chef Mario Batali

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