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Damaging storms kill 1 in Texas as system tears through the South

One typhoon killed one person in Texas on Tuesday as hailstorms swept through communities and strong winds hit trees in power poles in some parts of the South. Authorities have warned of a possible hurricane early in what could be two days of unrest in the region. , about 100 miles southeast of the country. Dallas, Whitehouse Mayor James Wansley said. Officials say at least four homes in the area were hit by trees. More than 43,000 homes and businesses were without electricity on Tuesday evening from east Texas to Georgia. No injuries were reported, but the National Weather Service said it was sending an investigation team to look into the damage caused by the storm in Wetumpka, Alabama. Lightning strikes a thriving market in northern Alabama’s Lacey’s Spring region, causing fires to burn the building, according to media reports, and flooding in Mobile Bay, covering an area of ​​a hill on top Interstate 10. Trees and their limbs cover a highway. for several hours in Newton County, Mississippi. As the hurricane made its way into Georgia, a large tree fell through the roof of Marie Jordan’s home in downtown Atlanta, landing in the living room, kitchen and garage. “It just took everything,” Jordan told WSB-TV. “I’ve spent years looking at this tree.” Elsewhere in Texas, one person was injured when a tornado swept through Johnson County, 40 miles southwest of Dallas. Brittaney Deaton says she got into an RV trailer behind her family home after the trailer overturned. She said her father was injured in an attempt to free her. “I was screaming on the phone, unable to get out. I was terrified,” Deaton told KDFW-TV. “And I felt like I was just being caught, like he was going to roll with me inside. And I just thanked God that I was out.” Her mother, Amber Zeleny, said her husband had injuries to his nose, leg and ribs. . but he is expected to recover. Severe hurricanes with strong hurricanes are likely to sweep across a vast area from southern Mississippi to the coasts of Georgia and South Carolina, according to the Storm Forecast Center. The high-risk area includes more than 8 million people in the Alabama Mobile and Montgomery cities; Tallahassee, Florida; and Columbus and Savannah in Georgia. Forecasters said they would return north on Wednesday, with the possibility of a hurricane in the region rising from western Alabama to the western Carolinas. More than 10 million people in metro areas including Atlanta; Birmingham; and Chattanooga, Tennessee, will be at risk, according to the Storm Forecast Center. Summer often brings severe storms to the southeast, and the region has experienced severe weather recently including a hurricane last month in metro New Orleans, where one person died. , and a hurricane that killed at least two people in the Florida Panhandle last week.

One typhoon killed one person in Texas on Tuesday as hailstorms swept through communities and strong winds hit trees in power poles in some parts of the South. Authorities have warned of an earthquake early in what could be two days of unrest in the region.

In east Texas, WM Soloman, 71, died when a hurricane knocked down a tree at Solomon’s home in Whitehouse, about 100 miles southeast of Dallas, Whitehouse Mayor James Wansley said. Officials say at least four homes in the area were hit by trees.

More than 43,000 homes and businesses were without electricity on Tuesday evening from eastern Texas to Georgia. No injuries were reported, but the National Weather Service said it was sending an investigation team to look into the damage caused by the storm in Wetumpka, Alabama. Lightning strikes a shopping mall in northern Alabama’s Lacey’s Spring area, causing fires to burn the building, according to media reports, and flooding in Mobile Bay, covering a mountainous area on the Interstate 10.

Falling trees and limbs covered an area of ​​highway for several hours in Newton County, Mississippi. As the hurricane line swept through Georgia, a large tree fell through the roof of Marie Jordan’s home in downtown Atlanta, landing in the living room, kitchen and garage.

“It just took everything,” Jordan said WSB-TV. “I have been watching this tree for years.”

Elsewhere in Texas, one person was injured when a tornado swept through Johnson County, 40 miles southwest of Dallas. Brittaney Deaton says she got into an RV trailer behind her family home after the trailer overturned. She said her father was injured in an attempt to save her.

“I was screaming on the phone, unable to get out. I was terrified,” Deaton told KDFW-TV. “And I felt like I was stuck, like she was going to roll with me inside. And thank God I came out.”

Her mother, Amber Zeleny, said her husband had injuries to his nose, legs and ribs but was expected to recover.

Extreme hurricanes and hurricanes are likely to sweep across a vast area south of Mississippi to the coasts of Georgia and South Carolina, according to the Hurricane Center. The high-risk area includes more than 8 million people in the Alabama Mobile and Montgomery cities; Tallahassee, Florida; and Columbus and Savannah in Georgia.

The isolated areas could receive more than 5 inches of rain in the afternoon on Tuesday, increasing the risk of flooding and loosening the ground so that the trees could also explode, forecasters said.

The threat of climate change will return to the north on Wednesday, forecasters said, with the possibility of a severe hurricane in the region rising from western Alabama to the western Carolinas. More than 10 million people in metro areas including Atlanta; Birmingham; and Chattanooga, Tennessee, will be at risk, according to the Forecast Center.

Summer brings severe storms to the southeast, and the region has experienced severe weather recently including a hurricane last month in metro New Orleans, where one person died, and a hurricane that killed at least two people at the Florida Panhandle last week.

Damaging storms kill 1 in Texas as system tears through the South Source link Damaging storms kill 1 in Texas as system tears through the South

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