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DACA marks 10 years of providing undocumented residents protections

Wednesday, June 15 marks the 10th anniversary of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals Act, also known as the DACA. The policy was implemented by former President Barack Obama in 2012, allowing undocumented immigrants as children to work, study and participate in their community without fear of deportation. Those protected under this policy are provided with a Social Security number, temporary work permit and deportation protection if they meet the following conditions: Must be under 31 years of age June 15, 2012 Come to the United States before completing your 16th birthday. Permanently residing in the country since 15 June 2007 Have a high school diploma, GED certificate or be an honorary dismissed veteran of the Coast Guard or the Armed Forces Have not been convicted of a felony or major misdemeanor Since 2012, approximately 825,000 people have received DACA protection. One of these recipients is Robert Nuñez from Sacramento. He benefited from the program for seven years. He says the program not only allowed him to work legally in the United States, but also impacted his career. “DACA really started my passion for wanting to make a policy change and help the community I come from and just continue to support more immigrant inclusion policies and immigration reform,” Nuñez said. Nuñez works for the state Senate and various nonprofits that work to help the lives of immigrants. “Thousands of people across the country are pushing Congress to pass legislation that could provide permanent protection to undocumented residents. We have been here for the last 10 years and how far we still have to go,” Nuñez said. to thousands of temporary relief, the program does not provide a path to citizenship Nuñez said the program is like being on an amusement park train: he never knows what might happen next, making the application process a source of stress for him “There is always this sense of indirectness, that it is not forever,” Nuñez said. care at risk – livelihood. ” In those 10 years, the program has withstood victories and setbacks, and last year a federal judge in Texas ruled that new DACA applications be effectively closed to those who have not already enrolled in the program. are scheduled for early next month.

Wednesday, June 15 marks the 10th anniversary of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals Act, also known as the DACA.

The policy was implemented by former President Barack Obama in 2012, allowing undocumented immigrants as children to work, study and become part of their community without fear of deportation.

Those protected under this policy are provided with a social security number, temporary work permit and deportation protection, provided they meet the following conditions:

  • Be under 31 from June 15, 2012
  • Come to the United States before completing your 16th birthday.
  • He has been living in the country since June 15, 2007
  • Have a high school diploma, GED certificate or be an honorary dismissed veteran of the Coast Guard or the Armed Forces
  • They have not been convicted of a felony or serious misdemeanor

Since 2012, approximately 825,000 people have received protection under DACA.

One of these recipients is Robert Nuñez from Sacramento. He benefited from the program for seven years. He says the program not only allowed him to work legally in the United States, but also impacted his career.

“DACA really started my passion for wanting to make a policy change and help the community I come from and just continue to support more immigrant inclusion policies and immigration reform,” Nuñez said.

Nuñez works for the state Senate and various nonprofits that work to help the lives of immigrants.

Thousands of people across the country are pushing for Congress to pass legislation that could provide permanent protection to undocumented residents.

“I keep hearing people celebrating 10 years of DACA, but it’s not really a celebration as a recognition of the situation we’ve been in for the last 10 years and how far we still have to go,” Nuñez said.

Although the program has given thousands of temporary relief, the program does not provide a path to citizenship. Nuñez said the program is like being on an amusement park train: he never knows what might happen next, making the application process a source of stress for him.

“There is always this sense of obsession, that it is not forever,” Nuñez said. “Just knowing that if one step in the process goes wrong, or if you choose the wrong context, can jeopardize your job, your health care – your livelihood.”

During these 10 years, the program endured victories and setbacks. Last year, a federal judge in Texas issued a ruling blocking new DACA applications, effectively closing the door on those who have not already enrolled in the program. Oral hearings in the U.S. Court of Appeals are scheduled for early next month.

DACA marks 10 years of providing undocumented residents protections Source link DACA marks 10 years of providing undocumented residents protections

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