California

‘Confused’ Waymo self-driving cars are flooding a dead-end street in San Francisco

Residents of a typical quiet area of ​​San Francisco suffer from humming from several waymo cars that are crowded with dead-end streets.

Mysterious sightings come from the end of 15th Avenue, Residents told a local news station that up to 50 self-driving cars seemed confused as they entered the area. KPIX..

Resident Jennifer King said KPIX The vehicle being tested in California In the city, everyone makes a multi-point turn and departs from where they entered. Sometimes multiple cars arrive at the same time.

Jennifer King, who lives in the Richmond area, told KPIX “I noticed it while I was sleeping.” “I woke up to a strange ham, and I thought there was a spaceship outside the window in my bedroom.”

Scroll down to watch the video

Resident Jennifer King told KPIX that all vehicles being tested in California would make a multipoint turn, after which multiple vehicles could arrive at the same time simply by departing from where they arrived.

Waymo told the press that it was investigating the issue. DailyMail.com contacted a company owned by Alphabet for more information.

important Waymo, self-driving unit for $ 30 billion Google parent company alphabetUnleashed a self-driving taxi service in San Francisco to expand testing in August.

The tests are conducted by an “autonomous specialist” who can collect feedback during the ride-sharing trip and take over in an emergency.

Rideshare testing isn’t much talked about until multiple cars start flooding the dead end streets.

Mysterious sightings come from the end of 15th Avenue (pictured). Here, up to 50 self-driving cars appear confused as they enter the area.

Mysterious sightings come from the end of 15th Avenue (pictured). Here, up to 50 self-driving cars appear confused as they enter the area.

The street has a sign that informs oncoming vehicles that the street is a dead end

The street has a sign that informs oncoming vehicles that the street is a dead end

King told KPIX that she and other residents had spoken to a Waymo employee sitting behind the steering wheel. Expecting to understand strange behavior, but employees said, “They are just doing their job.”

Andrea Lewin, who also lives in the area, told KPIX that the turmoil lasted for about six to eight weeks, and at any time of the day.

Waymo welcomed its first rider in Phoenix, Arizona four years ago, and since October 2020, the service has provided tens of thousands of fully autonomous rides, the company shared in an August press release.

Google began developing self-driving technology in 2009, within the secret X Lab.

In 2014, the tech giant shared its first prototype with the world, and in 2016, Waymo was renamed and became its own division at Alphabet.

Since the first test, Waymo has made some improvements to the car, from style to internal technology.

The company said it has improved its “rider” computer vision system to allow the system to detect changing traffic lights far in front of the vehicle.

The technology can also identify pedestrians crossing the road without warning. “Even if it suddenly appears from behind a vehicle in the oncoming lane.”

The tests are conducted by an

The tests are conducted by an “autonomous specialist” who can collect feedback during the ride-sharing trip and take over in an emergency.

“We also designed the software to infer the context essential for driving safely in a busy city,” the Waymo team shared in a statement.

“Our perception system informs our drivers how to handle pedestrians, trees, and pedestrians carrying Christmas trees.

“If you pull up next to the bus at the Fisherman’s Wharf Beach Street pedestrian crossing, the driver can infer that hidden passengers could get off and cross the street immediately.”

Waymo is one of several automotive and technology companies testing autonomous driving, although no major deployment has begun.

GM announced in December last year that it would deploy a full-drive car in San Francisco, unleashing the concept of a robot taxi a month later.

The company’s Cruise Origin is the first self-driving car designed without pedals, engines, or steering wheels.

Origin can accommodate four passengers at a time, but like ride-sharing services like Uber and Lyft, one customer can call it for a ride.

By the end of 2019, Cruise planned to run the robotaxi service, which consists of Chevrolet Bolts, without a human backup driver.

The plan was postponed last year after one of Uber’s autonomous test vehicles broke down in the suburbs of Phoenix, Tempe, Arizona, killing pedestrians.

‘Confused’ Waymo self-driving cars are flooding a dead-end street in San Francisco Source link ‘Confused’ Waymo self-driving cars are flooding a dead-end street in San Francisco

Related Articles

Back to top button