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Commanders who oversaw training where nine marines died in tank were ‘burnt out from the pandemic’

The military commander, who oversaw a training exercise that killed nine soldiers, was burned down by a pandemic and overwhelmed by the outlook for the war. Iran When Donald TrumpAccording to a new report, the militaryization of the southern border.

Eight Marines aged 18-23 and one sailor on July 30, 2020, amphibious vehicle California..

The armored-to-land carrier took water and sank from the coast of San Clemente Island while returning to USS Somerset.

On Wednesday, the results of two investigations into the accident, one from the Marine Corps and one from the Navy, were announced.

While not tolerating leadership failure, they found the commander stressed and struggling to cope with many competing demands.

An amphibious vehicle like the one in the picture sank in July 2020, killing eight Marines and one sailor. The marine inventory has approximately 800 AAVs that can carry up to 21 people, each weighing 26 tons.

The amphibious vehicle returned to the USS Somerset (pictured) when it sank in July 2020.

The amphibious vehicle returned to the USS Somerset (pictured) when it sank in July 2020.

General Karl Mandy, who led the Marine Corps investigation, said that it was a mistake to underestimate or overlook the demands on the military, causing many mistakes.

Lieutenant General Karl Mandy III led the Marine Corps investigation, reporting that many commanders expressed concern about their heavy and competing demands for their time when the tragedy struck.

Lieutenant General Karl Mandy III led the Marine Corps investigation, reporting that many commanders expressed concern about their heavy and competing demands for their time when the tragedy struck.

“Their claims about time and attention were revealed in many interviews with several senior officers who described the situation during this period as second only to the combat experience,” Mandy wrote.

He said the “related response” to the outbreak of the coronavirus on the USS Theodore Roosevelt aircraft carrier provided a “compressed and complex available training opportunity” for the 15th Marine Expeditionary Unit.

The Marines were also tasked with providing security to USNS Mercy, a hospital ship deployed off California to assist COVID-19 patients in the heyday of the pandemic.

Mandy also said the Marines had many other “non-standard” missions at the time, including being sent to the US-Mexico border for Trump’s immigrant patrols.

Finally, he said, “We are planning a major combat operation due to heightened tensions with Iran in January 2020.”

Pfc Brian J. Baltiera, 19 years old, Corona, California

Corporal Gillermo S. Perez of New Braunfels, Texas, 20 years old.

The body of Pfc Brian J. Baltiera (left), 19, in Corona, California, was sent to Delaware. Found on the scene was Corporal Reims Gillermo S. Perez (right), 20 years old, in New Braunfels, Texas.His body was flown to Dover Base on August 5th

Corporal Marco A. Baranco of Montebello, California, 21 years old

Pfc Jack Ryan Ostrovsky, Bend, Oregon, 21

Other victims include Corporal Marco A. Baranco of Montebello, California (left), 21 years old, Pfc Jack Ryan Ostrovsky of Bend, Oregon (right), 21 years old.

Pfc Evan A. Bath, 19, from Oak Creek, Wisconsin, died in an accident last year.

Pfc Evan A. Bath, 19, from Oak Creek, Wisconsin, died in an accident last year.

Christopher Gnem, 22, a US Navy NCO in Stockton, California, was one of the victims. After his death, Gnem was promoted to Petty Officer Third Class and qualified as a Fleet Marine Corps War Specialist.

Christopher Gnem, 22, a US Navy NCO in Stockton, California, was one of the victims. After his death, Gnem was promoted to Petty Officer Third Class and qualified as a Fleet Marine Corps War Specialist.

Cpl Wesley A. Rodd, Harris, Texas, 23

Corporal Chase D. Sweetwood, Portland, Oregon, 19

Cpl Cesar A. Villanueva, Riverside, California, 21 years old

Other victims include Corporal Lance Chase D. Sweetwood (center) in Oak Creek, Wisconsin, 19 years old, Corporal Wesley A. Rod (left) in Harris, Texas, 23 years old, Corporal Cesar A. Villanueva (right). , 21 years old included.Riverside, California

In March, Marine Corps investigators realized that death was “preventable,” and stated that complacency, inadequate maintenance and inspection, and inadequate training were all causes of tragedy.

Victims of amphibious tank disasters

  • Pfc.Brian J. Baltiera, 18 years old, Corona, California
  • Corporal Reims Marco A in Montebello, California. Barranco, 21 years old
  • Pfc. Evan A in Oak Creek, Wisconsin. Bath, 19 years old
  • Christopher Gunem, Navy NCO, Stockton, California, 22 years old
  • Pfc.Jack Ryan Ostrovsky, Bend, Oregon, 21
  • Corporal Reims Gillermo S. Perez, New Braunfels, Texas, 20
  • Cpl.Wesley A. Rod, Harris, Texas, 23
  • Corporal Reims Chase D in Portland, Oregon. Sweetwood, 18 years old
  • Cpl. Cesar A in Riverside, California. Villanueva, 21 years old

Seven Marines in the vehicle, including the commander, survived.

Rescue operations were chaotic, they found, and pumps designed to prevent the ship from sinking did not work fast enough.

They found that a “series of mechanical failures” caused the tragedy rather than one factor.

In May, it was announced that Maj. Gen. Robert Castellvi, then commander of the 1st Marine Division of Camp Pendleton, had been suspended.

A month later he was fired. He is the highest-ranking officer who faced disciplinary action in the wake of a disaster.

His firings followed in October 2020 after Captain Michael J. Legner, commander of the 1st Battalion 4th Marine Expeditionary Unit landing team, and Captain Christopher Bronzi, commander of the 15th Marine Expeditionary Unit. I was broken. His command in March 2021.

A Marine Corps spokesman, Captain Ryan Bruce, confirmed that a total of 12 Marines were or would be punished for their role in the accident. Military.com..

The Navy did not dismiss their commanders, but Vice Admiral Roy Kitchener said some faced administrative action. He didn’t say who was rebuked or how he was rebuked.

“This tragedy should never have happened,” Kitchener said.

“We will not waste our lives. We will learn from this and permanently improve the way we plan and carry out amphibious operations.

He said the Navy “reworked procedures and doctrines, clarified aspects of amphibious operations, and established new training requirements to prevent future tragedy.”

Aerial view of the coast near San Clemente Island where the incident occurred

Aerial view of the coast near San Clemente Island where the incident occurred

Photo: Map showing the location of San Clemente Island off San Diego

Photo: Map showing the location of San Clemente Island off San Diego

According to a Navy investigation led by Maj. Gen. Christopher Sweeney, Navy Captain Dave Kurtz, then commander of USS Somerset, “fully understands the communication path between the ships involved in the operation and the Navy vehicles. I didn’t. ”

Maj. Gen. Christopher Sweeney, who led the Navy's investigation, discovered that there was something published in the correspondence, but it did not cause the accident in itself.

Maj. Gen. Christopher Sweeney, who led the Navy’s investigation, discovered that there was something published in the correspondence, but it did not cause the accident in itself.

However, Navy officials found that Somerset, who was heading for the amphibious vehicle when it sank, responded quickly when the seriousness of the situation became apparent, and communication problems did not cause a disaster. Did.

Both Mandy and Sweeney made a series of recommendations. This includes that a safety boat equipped to deal with the distressed boat should be available.

At the time of the accident, the Navy’s safety craft were under maintenance, and other armored landing craft were being used instead.

While attempting rescue, he collided with a sunken vehicle, capsized and urged him to sink rapidly.

Christiana Sweetwood, who was among the Marines whose son was killed, said Washington post She was not impressed with the explanation given.

“It feels like a lot has been thrown at us at this point,” she said.

“It’s like everyone is pointing their fingers at each other.”

She said she was relieved by the Navy’s promise to demand a safety vessel in the future.

“I’m trying to find my blessing wherever I am,” she said.

“Their safety boats, they are fast.”

Commanders who oversaw training where nine marines died in tank were ‘burnt out from the pandemic’ Source link Commanders who oversaw training where nine marines died in tank were ‘burnt out from the pandemic’

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