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Chevy Bolt owners frustrated by slow response to recall of fire-prone batteries

General Motors has recalled 140,000 Chevrolet Bolts after some batteries caught fire. But Action News investigators have learned that many Bolt owners are struggling to replace faulty batteries, while skyrocketing gas prices are prompting more people to consider electric vehicles. Action News: Check it out in the video player above. GM said 19 bolts have caught fire. The recall covers all Bolts built from 2017 to 2022, including one owned by Stephanie Nabry. She bought the car for her daughter, Jada. “When we first got it, she loved it. It really suits her personality. It’s cute and it’s like bubbles,” said Stephanie. Then last year it received the recall notice warning that the Bolt’s battery was defective and could catch fire. could catch fire. Honestly, I freaked out,” Stephanie said. “It’s just a scary thought to blow up and there are so many different precautions that I have to take to drive it,” Jada Nabry said. In December, GM sent Stephanie an email announcing a temporary fix that allows cars to safely charge overnight inside a garage. GM said the software update automatically limits charging to 80 percent capacity and allows the Bolt to go further on a single charge than before the fix. But even with the software update, Stephanie said Jada could only go about 75 miles on a nearly full charge. This week, Stephanie filed a lawsuit against GM, one of several brought by attorney Robert Silverman over the defective Bolt battery. “These people can’t work, they can’t go on trips because they can’t find charging stations fast enough so they have to charge over and over again, and there’s a lot of fear. People are really afraid of their cars catching on fire,” Silverman said. While only a small percentage of Bolts have caught on fire, Silverman said, “It’s definitely an unacceptable opportunity because it can burn your house down and kill your family.” GM has not filed a response to the lawsuit. GM spokesman Kevin Kelly said, “We will continue to work with our dealers to complete the battery module replacement for owners.” Asked how long it will take, Kelly said, “We continue to make progress on battery replacements and the number of completions continues to increase on a daily basis.” But Stephanie and Jada said they’ve waited long enough. the battery can be replaced. So I really just want a solution,” Stephanie said. Jada worked throughout high school to help pay for the car. “It’s especially frustrating now because I feel like all that money went to waste and as a high school student going to college, I mean, I have a lot to pay for in the future and I really wanted to save that money. But now I don’t have any of that money and I have thousands of dollars that are just gone,” Jada said. GM said anyone with a Bolt should receive a software fix to eliminate the risk of fire. More: Bolt recall information

General Motors has recalled 140,000 Chevrolet Bolts after some batteries caught fire.

But sister station Action News Investigates has learned that many Bolt owners are struggling to replace faulty batteries, while rising gas prices are prompting more people to consider electric vehicles.

Action News Investigates: Watch the report in the video player above.

GM said 19 Bolts have caught fire. The recall covers all Bolts built from 2017 to 2022, including one owned by Stephanie Nabry. She bought the car for her daughter, Jada.

“When we first got it, she loved it. It really suits her personality. It’s cute and it’s like bubbles,” Stephanie said.

Then last year it received the recall notice warning that the Bolt’s battery was defective and could catch fire.

“I was a bit panicked because my daughter drives it mostly and they say it could catch fire. Honestly, I freaked out,” Stephanie said.

“It’s just a scary thought that it’s even blowing up and there’s so many different precautions that I have to take to drive it,” Jada Nabry said.

In December, GM sent Stephanie an email announcing a temporary fix that allows cars to safely charge overnight inside a garage.

GM said the software update automatically limits charging to 80 percent capacity and allows the Bolt to go further on a single charge than it could before the fix.

But even with the software update, Stephanie said Jada could only go about 75 miles on a nearly full charge.

This week, Stephanie filed a lawsuit against GM, one of several that attorney Robert Silverman has filed over the defective Bolt battery.

“These people can’t work, they can’t go on trips because they can’t find charging stations fast enough, so they have to charge over and over again, and there’s a lot of fear. People are really afraid of their cars catching on fire,” Silverman said.

While only a small percentage of Bolts have caught on fire, Silverman said, “It’s definitely an unacceptable opportunity because it could burn your house down and kill your family.”

GM has not filed a response to the lawsuit.

GM spokesman Kevin Kelly said: “We will continue to work with our dealers to complete the battery module replacement for owners.”

Asked how long it will take, Kelly said: “We continue to make progress on battery replacements and the number of completions continues to increase on a daily basis.”

But Stephanie and Jada said they’ve waited long enough.

“I mean, it’s been going on for nine months, 10 months and we don’t know when the battery can be replaced. So I really just want a solution,” Stephanie said.

Jada worked throughout high school to help pay for the car.

“It’s especially frustrating now because I feel like all that money went to waste, and as a high school student going to college, I mean I have a lot to pay for in the future and I really wanted to save that money. But now I don’t have any of that money and I have thousands of dollars that are just gone,” Jada said.

GM said anyone with a Bolt should receive a software fix to eliminate the risk of fire.

More: Bolt recall information

Chevy Bolt owners frustrated by slow response to recall of fire-prone batteries Source link Chevy Bolt owners frustrated by slow response to recall of fire-prone batteries

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