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Central Florida parents lose hundreds of dollars in Easter egg delivery scam

Some parents and children in Central Florida woke up on Easter morning and found no eggs in their yard after paying for their delivery. Parents in Clermont and Minneola said someone used social media to defraud families with hundreds of dollars in a religious celebration. scam. Parents saw “Egg my Yard” leaflets circulating in groups on Facebook. He advertised prices to order Easter eggs stuffed with candy or toys and then a delivery from someone who would scatter the eggs outside a house “with a note from the Easter bunny”. A person behind the Facebook account named “Sarah Honey” posted the ad. “It was like ‘don’t forget to pay me for the Easter eggs if you still want them,'” Cohen said. “Delivery of Easter eggs ranges between $ 20-75. Parents were told they would have to pay in advance via Cash App, Zelle or Venmo.” I ran down at five in the morning and looked out of our yard and there were no eggs, “he said. Kristen Kladiva’s parent. “So I was devastated and had no plans b.” Some of the other victims said they did not have a single backup plan and had to explain to their children why there were no eggs on Easter morning. “Well, you’s supposed to be there,” said Gigi Capria, the grandparents who fell victim to the scam. The parents said the person behind the leaflets did not respond to their messages. Capria said: “We noticed that the Venmo account was abruptly removed. “Dozens of people commented under Capria’s Facebook post saying they had been deceived by the same person behind the Facebook account. Community members joined in to keep the Easter spirit alive.” “We received messages from people saying ‘Hello, I want to help.’ “Our church has extra eggs,” said Eileen Scates, whose sister was the victim of a scam. “This is Easter,” Scates said. “This is Easter,” Scates said. “Love, hope and joy. Although this was a terrible thing to do, it was nice to see the community gather. “WESH’s sister station has not yet received a response from law enforcement, but some parents said they approached local police WESH also contacted the person behind the Facebook account that posted the booklets, but has not received a response.

Some parents and children in Central Florida woke up on Easter morning and found no eggs in their yard after paying for their delivery.

Parents in Clermont and Minneola said someone used social media to defraud families with hundreds of dollars in a religious celebration.

“How hurt you have to be to do this to a bunch of kids,” said scam parent Mizzy Cohen.

Parents saw “Egg my Yard” leaflets circulating in groups on Facebook. He advertised prices to order Easter eggs stuffed with candy or toys and then a delivery from someone who would scatter the eggs outside a house “with a note from the Easter bunny”.

A person behind the Facebook account named “Sarah Honey” posted the ad.

“[The person] it was like “don’t forget to pay me for the easter eggs if you still want them,” Cohen said.

The leaflets stated that the prices for the delivery of the Easter eggs range between $ 20-75. Parents were told they would have to pay in advance via Cash App, Zelle or Venmo.

“I ran down at five [Easter] in the morning and I looked out of our yard and there were no eggs, “said parent Kristen Kladiva.” So I was devastated and had no plan b. “

Some of the other victims said they did not have a spare plan and had to explain to their children why there were no eggs on Easter morning.

“I sent a message, I called and I sent a message again and I called again after my last message [to the person] it was “well, you’s supposed to be there,” said Gigi Capria, a grandparent who fell victim to the scam.

The parents said that the person behind the leaflets did not respond to their messages.

“It simply came to our notice then [the person] “It had six Facebook pages,” Capria said. “It simply came to our notice then [their] “The Venmo account was suddenly lost.”

Capria posted about the scam on social media and quickly learned that she was not alone.

“I find the post and I see all the comments from everyone else [the person scammed]Said Cohen.

Dozens of people commented below Capria’s Facebook post saying they had been deceived by the same person behind the Facebook account.

Community members joined in to keep the Easter spirit alive.

“We received messages from people saying ‘Hello, I want to help.’ “Our church has extra eggs,” said Eileen Scates, whose sister was the victim of a scam. [these victims] they are working moms, unmarried moms and they worked this Easter like that [delivery] it would be the highlight of their day. “

Last-minute Easter gifts from generous community members were delivered to some of the affected families to help turn frowns into smiles.

“This is Easter,” Scates said. “Love, hope and joy. Even though this terrible thing happened, it was nice to see the community unite.”

The brother WESH station has not yet received any news from law enforcement, but some of the parents said they contacted the local police department to report the fraud. WESH also contacted the person behind the Facebook account that posted the booklets, but has not received a response.

Central Florida parents lose hundreds of dollars in Easter egg delivery scam Source link Central Florida parents lose hundreds of dollars in Easter egg delivery scam

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