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California officials study drought benefits of salinity barrier

On Monday, the California Department of Water Resources (DWR) released a draft Environmental Impact Report, which examines the benefits and potential effects of repetitive use of the temporary salinity barrier in delta region. This white barrier is on the West Bank. It is a ground wall that helps keep salt water from the Bay region from penetrating into the mountain water system during severe droughts. In non-drought conditions, rainfall and snow melt with regular drainage of water from large ponds keep salt water at a distance from the pits. But as water supply declines, water flow must be limited to ensure other water needs are met. ” So what has allowed us to do it is to make the Delta fresh for the benefit of the local Delta region with the release of bad water. ”Said Jacob MrQuirk, mission engineer for DWR. If the delta region is contaminated with salt water, millions will lose access to drinking water, including farmers, who depend on the region for irrigation. A study released on Monday specifically looked at the impact of using this temporary white barrier twice over time. the next 10 years. It has been found that in general, the barrier has succeeded in blocking salt water, but the effects of other species of animals have been observed, including delta smelt.McQuirk says DWR is working to reduce these effects. The first salinity barrier is the only tool that DWR can do. we need to make the most of it as climate change threatens the West with a long drought. ” We are learning that climate change is increasing our challenges. That means more overgrowth and seed, more drying up of the environment, so really, what the mother’s environment actually stores, we don’t know, ”McQuirk said.

On Monday, the California Department of Water Resources (DWR) released a Environmental Impact Report, which examines the benefits and potential effects of repetitive use of the temporary salinity barrier guard in the delta.

This white barrier is in the West Lakes River. It is a ground wall that helps keep salt water from the Bay region from penetrating into the mountain water system during severe droughts.

In non-drought conditions, rainfall and snow melt with regular drainage of water from large ponds keep salt water at a distance from the pits. But as water supply is declining, water discharge must be limited to ensure compliance with other water needs.

“It simply came to our notice then [drought barrier] What allowed us to do it was to make the Delta fresh for efficient use of the Delta’s indoor water supply with the release of water shortages, ”said Jacob MrQuirk, law engineer for DWR.

If the delta area is contaminated with salt water, millions will lose access to drinking water, including farmers, who rely on water wells for irrigation.

A study released on Monday looked specifically at the impact of using this temporary whitewash for an extra double over the next 10 years.

It has been found that in general, the barrier is successful in blocking salt water, but its effect on other species of animals has been observed. including the smell of delta.

McQuirk said DWR is working to reduce these effects.

The drought salinity barrier is one tool that DWR may need to use more than climate change threatens western countries and the duration of drought.

“We’re learning that climate change poses more of a challenge for us. That means more overgrowth and variety, more drying up of the environment, so really, what exactly the mother’s environment is storing, we don’t know,” McQuirk said.

California officials study drought benefits of salinity barrier Source link California officials study drought benefits of salinity barrier

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