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California lawmakers propose extending eviction protections

Hundreds of thousands of tenants in California facing next week’s eviction could receive a three-month extra protection under a bill approved by top congressional leaders on Thursday. The federal government has sent billions of dollars to states to help people with they went back to paying their rent during the outbreak. . California plans to pay 100% of unpaid rent if they meet certain income requirements. The law expires on March 31. Meanwhile, many people have sought help that has made state officials take longer than they thought to hand over the funds. As of Tuesday, more than 275,600 people were in need of assistance, he said. to California Business, Customer Service and Housing Commission. This number does not include assistance programs run by local governments. State officials will not be able to approve all of these applications by March 31. From April 1, anyone who has not paid their rent can be evicted. On Thursday, two lawmakers – Congressman Tim Grayson and Buffy Wicks, a Democrat – introduced a bill that would extend deportation protections for people awaiting applications until the end of June. Lawmakers are scheduled to hold a public hearing on next week’s bill before a vote to send it to Governor Gavin Newsom on March 31. “The governor is in favor of extending his term. tenants well up until the summer with the assurance that everyone who qualifies has protection under them. this is a rent-seeking assistance program that guides the community as it travels, “his office said in an email on Thursday. that they are being harassed, in some cases., traveling for more than a year without paying rent. Concerns about the bill have been combined. “said Debra Carlton, California. Executive Vice President of the Apartment Association of State Government and Legal Affairs. presented will protect humanity nen who only asked for help that day. The Alliance of Californians for Community Empowerment, a group representing tenants, says lawmakers should give people more time to apply. Anything left, they say, would be a “landlord’s bail that results in thousands of families on the streets.” The bill is expected to pass quickly by Congress. On Thursday, two congressional leaders – Speaker Anthony Rendon and Pro Tempore Senate President Toni Atkins, both Democrats – issued a joint statement saying the bill “would take immediate action.” “We promise those who are online and should not be harmed because of the length of time the system lasts,” Rendon and Atkins said in a joint statement. Extending the term will benefit people like Jenise Dixon, whose application for rental assistance has been pending since October. Dixon says she has lived in a one-room apartment in Los Angeles for 19 years. on the payment of her rent. “I’m far from homeless,” she said. stuck because she or her landlord cannot provide rent. She said she submitted a receipt and other evidence to prove that she was living in the house, but to no avail. “Even if I am approved, it will not be the end of all my previous months,” she said Tuesday during a press conference. a press conference organized by real estate advisers is calling for an extension of eviction protection. “I urge the people in front, the legislators, to give the system a chance to succeed so that the camera people do not fall into confusion.” So far, California has paid nearly $ 2.5 billion in rent subsidies. to more than 214,000 homes, for an average of $ 11,488. State officials say most of the money goes to the low-income or low-income earners who earn less than 50% of their local average income. The program may end soon financially. State officials have asked for an additional $ 1.9 billion from the federal government, but so far they have received about $ 200 million. But tenants should not worry. Last month, Newsom signed a law that would allow state funds to pay for the program if the federal budget is not fully met.

Hundreds of thousands of tenants in California facing next week’s eviction could get an additional three months of protection under a bill passed by top congressional leaders on Thursday.

The federal government has sent billions of dollars to the states to help people who have fallen behind in paying their rent during the epidemic. The California plan will pay 100% of the rent to unpaid people if they meet certain income requirements.

State law says tenants cannot be evicted as long as they have a tenancy application. The law expires on March 31. Meanwhile, many people have asked for help as it takes longer than state officials to deliver.

As of Tuesday, more than 275,600 people have applications that are still pending, according to the California Department of Commerce, Housing Services and Housing. This number does not include assistance programs run by local governments. State officials will not be able to approve all of these applications by March 31. From April 1, anyone who has not paid their rent can be evicted.

The state legislature has now decided to intervene. Thursday, two lawmakers – Congressman Tim Grayson and Buffy Wicks, both Democrats – present a resolution which will extend deportation protection for people awaiting application until the end of June. Lawmakers are scheduled to hold a public hearing on the bill next week before a vote to send it to Governor Gavin Newsom on March 31.

“The governor is very supportive of extending the term which continues to effectively protect tenants until the summer and ensures that everyone who qualifies is protected under this national housing assistance scheme while traveling. , “his office said in an email Thursday.

The state has extended eviction protections several times during disasters, often over landlords’ dissatisfaction that they are being pressured, in some cases, to travel for more than a year without paying rent. Last year, Newsom said the resumption of protection was “arrogant.”

Responses to the bill are mixed. The largest housing association, the California Apartment Association, supported the bill because, while preventing some evictions, it would also prevent local governments from implementing their own, more stringent eviction laws.

“Balance is very important,” said Debra Carlton, executive vice president of the California Apartment Association on state affairs and law enforcement.

The California eviction assistance program will stop taking new applications on April 1, so the proposed law will only protect people who apply for assistance on that date. The Alliance of Californians for Community Empowerment, a group representing tenants, says lawmakers should give people more time to apply. Anything left, they say, would be “a balloon owner who creates thousands of families on the streets.”

The law is expected to pass quickly through Congress. On Thursday, two congressional leaders – Speaker Anthony Rendon and Pro Tempore Senate President Toni Atkins, both Democrats – issued a joint statement saying the bill “would take immediate action.”

“We promise those who are online and should not be harmed because of the length of time the project takes,” Rendon and Atkins said in a joint statement.

Extending the term will benefit people like Jenise Dixon, whose application for housing assistance has been pending since October. Dixon says she has lived in a one-room apartment in Los Angeles for 19 years. on the payment of her rent.

She said: “I am far from homeless.

But her need for help is stuck because she or her landlord cannot provide the rent. She said she presented bills and other evidence to prove she was living in the house, but things went awry.

“Even if I am approved, it will not cover all my previous months,” she said on Tuesday during a press conference organized by real estate activists calling for an extension of eviction protection. “I urge the people in the forefront, the legislators, to give the system a chance to succeed so that the camera people do not fall into confusion.”

So far, California has paid nearly $ 2.5 billion in rental assistance to over 214,000 homes, for an average of $ 11,488. State officials say most of the money goes to low-income or low-income households who earn less than 50% of their average income in their area. The program may end soon financially. State officials have demanded an additional $ 1.9 billion from the federal government, but so far they have received only about $ 200 million.

But tenants should not worry. Last month, Newsom signed a law that would allow state funds to pay for the program if the federal budget is not fully met.

California lawmakers propose extending eviction protections Source link California lawmakers propose extending eviction protections

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