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California lawmaker’s Kate Tibbitts Act targets ‘high-risk’ transient parolees

A member of the Elk Grove assembly has introduced a new bill aimed at improving the ability of prison agents to monitor transient prisoners who have been convicted of violent crimes or are required to register as sex offenders. The 1827 bill is called the Kate Tibbitts Act of 2022, after a 61-year-old homeowner in Sacramento’s Land Park neighborhood was killed along with her two dogs in September. (Previous cover in the video above.) The suspect in the case, Troy Davis, is a convicted violent criminal who was on probation at the time of the murder. He was allowed to leave prison after his arrest in June for stealing a car, and his release officer was never informed of the arrest, KCRA 3 Investigates reported. This arrest would most likely be a violation of his imprisonment. “Kate should have been here today, her absurd murder should never have happened,” Assembly member Jim Cooper D-Elk Grove said in a statement about the bill he is now passing. “We have too many temporary detainees who have little or no supervision because we can not find them. Kate Tibbitts’s law will fix that. ” Cooper, who is also a candidate for sheriff in Sacramento, said many “high-risk” inmates, as in the Tibbits case, have limited contact with their agent and this is especially true with humans. which are transient. A statement from his office said there were more than 2,200 conditional people in Sacramento County, including 370 homeless people. It is not clear how many of these belong to the high risk category that the legislation will target. Cooper said under current law, if a parolee fails to meet the obligations of regularly reporting to a release agent, he or she could be detained, but this is optional. AB 1827 would require all high-risk individuals who say it is temporary to wear a location tracking device until their address is confirmed. It would also be a misdemeanor when a high-risk prisoner knowingly refuses to report to his or her representative and could face up to six months in county jail if convicted. Cooper’s office said the bill would also give the courts the power to review parole terms. A press release from Cooper’s office cited a statement of support from Tibbitts’s brother, Dan Tibbitts. “The tragic loss of our sister, Kate Tibbitts, from a vicious, high-risk perpetrator was not only traumatic for our entire family, but for the Sacramento community as a whole,” said Dan Tibbitts. “Painfully, this tragedy could have been avoided if the state had the proper protocols for the release of high-risk prisoners. “Fortunately, Assembly member Jim Cooper, a 30-year-old law enforcement veteran, recognizes this public safety failure and is drafting a bill in the name of our late sister, Kate Tibbitts,” Cooper said.

A member of the Elk Grove assembly has introduced a new bill aimed at improving the ability of prison agents to monitor transient prisoners who have been convicted of violent crimes or are required to register as sex offenders.

The 1827 Assembly bill is called the Kate Tibbitts Act of 2022 by a 61-year-old homeowner in the Sacramento Land Park neighborhood. was killed along with her two dogs in September. (Previous coverage in the video above.)

The suspect in the case, Troy Davis, is a convicted violent criminal who was on probation at the time of the murder. He had been allowed to leave prison after being arrested in June for car theft and his release officer was never informed of this arrest, KCRA 3 Surveys reported. This arrest would most likely be a violation of his imprisonment.

“Kate should have been here today, her absurd murder should never have happened,” Assembly member Jim Cooper D-Elk Grove said in a statement on the bill he is now passing. “We have too many temporary detainees who have little or no supervision because we can not find them. “Kate Tibbitts law will fix it.”

Cooper, who is also a candidate for sheriff in Sacramento County, said many “high-risk” inmates, as in the Tibbits case, have limited contact with their release agent, especially with people who are temporary.

A statement from his office said there were more than 2,200 conditional people in Sacramento County, including 370 homeless people. It is not clear how many of these belong to the high risk category that the legislation will target.

Cooper said under current law, if a parolee fails to meet the obligations of regularly reporting to a release agent, he or she could be detained, but this is optional.

AB 1827 would require all high-risk individuals who say it is temporary to wear a location tracking device until their address is confirmed.

It would also be a misdemeanor when a high-risk prisoner knowingly refuses to report to his or her representative and could face up to six months in county jail if convicted. Cooper’s office said the bill would also give the courts the power to review parole terms.

A press release from Cooper’s office cited a statement of support from Tibbitts’s brother, Dan Tibbitts.

“The tragic loss of our sister, Kate Tibbitts, from a vicious, high-risk perpetrator was not only traumatic for our entire family, but for the Sacramento community as a whole,” said Dan Tibbitts. “Painfully, this tragedy could have been avoided if the state had the proper protocols for the release of high-risk prisoners. Fortunately, Assembly member Jim Cooper, a 30-year-old law enforcement veteran, acknowledges this public safety failure and is drafting a bill in the name of our late sister, Kate Tibbitts.

The bill will then be discussed in the Convention’s public safety committee, Cooper said.

California lawmaker’s Kate Tibbitts Act targets ‘high-risk’ transient parolees Source link California lawmaker’s Kate Tibbitts Act targets ‘high-risk’ transient parolees

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