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CA audits law enforcement agencies, including Stockton police

A new review examining five law enforcement departments across California found that services did not adequately address biased behavior. Services overseen by the Office of the Attorney General included the Stockton, San Jose, and San Bernardino Police Department, the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Office, and the California Department of Correction and Rehabilitation. The investigation found that some officers in the departments were involved in biased behavior during the interactions while on duty or on social media. | ABOUT Read the law enforcement check here Of the 450 officers who posted on public social media accounts, 17 had common biased statements or behavior, the audit found. No one came from Stockton police. Although the search found no officers who were members of hate groups, six officers indicated support for “troubled groups,” said California State Inspector Michael Tilden in a message to Governor Gavin Newsom and law enforcement officials. “For example, an officer issued a statement defending the Proud Boys – a group that has expressed hostility towards women and Muslims – saying that people who are against the Proud Boys are ‘really just against masculinity,'” the audit said. Other examples of biased behavior included a police officer telling racist jokes, mocking the appearance of a Vietnamese woman, and then denying her a translator. Among the problems from the departments: not using the right recruitment strategies so that officers reflect on the diversity of the community, not applying good enough community engagement or employee training strategies and not being proactive enough to detect potentially discriminatory behavior and create systems for the correction of this performance. In Stockton, for example, the audit said police had a lower percentage of Hispanic or Latino officers from communities, while the percentage of white officers “far exceeds the total population.” Only the Los Angeles sheriff and Stockton police had completed a formal plan to recruit applicants from various demographic groups. Stockton police were also the only department examined and had a comprehensive community engagement plan. The auditor also said that investigations into possible bias The officers’ conduct often contained shortcomings. “Many investigations have focused closely on blatant signs of bias, relied heavily on officers ‘denials or disregarded the way in which officers’ behavior was reasoned,” the audit summary said. The office outlines specific recommendations for services, and this government intervention is needed to help implement law enforcement reforms in the state. Lawmakers should also “amend state law to make it clear that law enforcement agencies can ask applicant officers to identify their public accounts on social media so that departments know the accounts and control them.” to identify content indicative of possible bias, such as links to hate groups. ” The Stockton Police Department released this statement in response to the audit: “The Stockton Police Department is looking forward to analyzing the audit and seeing how we can align our policies and procedures with regulatory requirements and current best practices to ensure that our officers are policing impartially and morally. ”

ONE New background examining five law enforcement departments across California found that the services did not adequately address the biased behavior. Services overseen by the state auditor’s office included the Stockton, San Jose, and San Bernardino Police Department, the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Office, and the California Department of Correction and Rehabilitation.

The audit found that some department officers behaved in a discriminatory manner during interactions during the service or on social media.

| ABOUT Read the law enforcement check here

Of the 450 officers who posted on public social media accounts, 17 had common biased statements or behavior, the audit found. None of them were from Stockton police.

Although the search did not find any officers who were members of hate groups, six officers supported “troubled groups,” said California State Inspector Michael Tilden in a message to Gavin Newsom and law enforcement officials.

“For example, an officer issued a statement defending the Proud Boys – a group that has expressed hostility towards women and Muslims – saying that people who are against the Proud Boys are ‘really just against masculinity,'” the audit said. in a summary.

Other examples of biased behavior included a police officer telling racist jokes, mocking the appearance of a Vietnamese woman and then denying her translator.

Among the department’s problems: not using the right recruitment strategies so that officers reflect on community diversity, not implementing good enough community engagement or employee training strategies, and not being proactive enough to detect potentially discriminatory behavior and create systems to correct this performance.

In Stockton, for example, the audit said police had a lower percentage of Hispanic or Latino officers from their communities, while the percentage of white officers “far exceeds the total population.”

Only the Los Angeles sheriff and Stockton police had completed a formal recruitment plan for candidates from various demographic groups.

Stockton police were also the only department examined and had a comprehensive community engagement plan.

The auditor also said that investigations into possible discriminatory behavior by officers often contained shortcomings.

“Many investigations have focused closely on blatant signs of bias, relied heavily on officers ‘denials or disregarded the way in which officers’ behavior was reasoned,” the audit summary said.

The office outlined specific recommendations for the departments and said state-level intervention was needed to help implement law enforcement reforms in the state.

For example, the Legislature should require departmental oral interviews to include assessments of the ability of applicant officers to interact with different communities and review reports, the audit said.

Lawmakers should also “amend state law to make it clear that law enforcement agencies can ask applicant officers to identify their public accounts on social media so that departments know the accounts and control them.” to detect content indicative of possible biases, such as links to hate groups. ”

The Stockton Police Department released this statement in response to the audit: “The Stockton Police Department is looking forward to analyzing the audit and seeing how we can align our policies and procedures with regulatory requirements and current best practices to ensure that our officers are policing impartially and morally. “

CA audits law enforcement agencies, including Stockton police Source link CA audits law enforcement agencies, including Stockton police

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