Local

April snow survey reveals third drought year in a row

A winter season that began with the snowiest December in the record will be reduced to the third year in a row. On Friday, officials will travel to remote research sites across the Sierra to record snow depth and, most importantly, content. in the water The manual measurements made on Friday will verify the sad statistics from hundreds of automated snow sensors found throughout the Sierra. Across the country, the snow and water it contains is just 39% of the average, according to the California Data Exchange. The April 1st snow survey is considered the most important of the season, as this is usually the time of year when the state is snowing. Water managers use the April 1st snow survey to measure how much water will be available in the driest months to come. this snow turns into runoff. As California prepares for a third consecutive drought, reservoirs are already well below average and will receive minimal snow help to replenish their storage. Lake Shasta, the state’s largest reservoir, was at 38% of capacity and only 48% of the April 1 average. Lake Oroville was at 47% of capacity and 67% of the average, according to the California Data Exchange. As the humid season draws to a close, Governor Gavin Newsom has already called on water utilities across the state to implement water-saving measures. The California Water Project has notified its customers that it will be able to deliver only 5% of the requested water supply. In the Sacramento area, Lake Folsom was at 59% of capacity and 95% of the average, according to state statistics. Water managers are beginning to capture more runoff as the threat of flooding weakens with the chances of other major storms. As of Friday morning, Lake Folsom was 426.73 feet above sea level. California State parks apply a speed limit of 5 miles per hour across the lake as soon as the lake surface falls below 400 feet.

A winter season that began with the snowiest December on record will be reduced to the third year in a row.

On Friday, officials will travel to remote research sites across the Sierra to record the depth of the snow and, most importantly, the water content of the Sierra’s snow.

Manual measurements made on Friday will verify the sad statistics from hundreds of automated snow sensors found across the Sierra.

Across the state, the snow and water it contains is just 39% of the average, according to the California Data Exchange.

The April 1 snow survey is considered to be its most important season, as this is usually the time of year when the state’s snowmobile is at its greatest depth.

Water managers are using the April 1st snow survey to measure how much water will be available in the driest months to come as this snow turns into runoff.

As California prepares for its third consecutive year of drought, the reservoirs are already well below average and will receive little help from the snowmobile to replenish their storage.

Lake Shasta, the state’s largest reservoir, was at 38% of capacity and only 48% of the April 1 average.

Lake Oroville was at 47% of capacity and 67% of the average, according to the California Data Exchange.

As the damp season draws to a close, Governor Gavin Newsom has already called on water utilities across the state to implement water-saving measures.

The California Water Project has notified its customers that it will be able to deliver only 5% of the requested water supply.

In the Sacramento area, Lake Folsom was at 59% of its capacity and 95% of the average, according to government statistics.

Water managers are starting to catch more runoff as the threat of flooding weakens with the possibility of more significant storms.

As of Friday morning, Lake Folsom was 426.73 feet above sea level.

California State Parks apply a 5 mph speed limit across the lake as soon as the lake surface falls below 400 feet.

April snow survey reveals third drought year in a row Source link April snow survey reveals third drought year in a row

Related Articles

Back to top button