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Ahead of a winter storm, these are the grocery items you should have in stock

Related video above: Snowstorm shopping, grocery store shelves exposed due to supply chain problems Experts are urging Americans to prepare, a powerful winter storm storms parts of the eastern United States Threatening with devastating glaze, sleet and snow. Make sure you’ve completed the basics: Learn how to prevent the pipe from freezing (for example, open the cabinet under a sink to heat it up or drip a faucet) Can), test smoke alarms and carbon monoxide detectors and prepare extras for radio and flashlight batteries, charging electronic devices, medicine etc. to identify everyone in the home Examination of needs. Make sure you have all the grocery equipment you need. This type of storm and its aftermath can disrupt heat, power, and communication services. .. It is not yet known how serious the impact will be and how long it will last. Also, provide everyone with at least three days’ worth of food and water in a supply chain problem that could make grocery shopping worse this weekend. Joann Sands, a clinical assistant professor at the Buffalo University School of Nursing who trains students in disaster and emergency preparedness, chooses foods that have long shelf lives, do not require cooking, and are not too salty. Spicy, these foods mean you’re more likely to drink more water, so the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention should be stocked up in your home. High-protein, non-perishable foods These include foods like energy, according to Sands, bars that don’t need to be refrigerated or frozen, protein bars, fruit bars, dried cereals, granola, peanut butter, dried fruits, rotten It’s also a good idea to have some difficult peanut milk with you when you’re looking around. Remember, according to Canned Ready.gov.Canned Dietetic Foods, you can run out of power when a storm hits your area. Have ready-to-eat canned meat, fruits, vegetables, canned juice, and a manual can opener. Juices and soups can be especially useful for the elderly and sick, according to the Federal Office for Emergency Management. If the can is swollen, dented or corroded, do not eat it. Food at hand when surviving a storm. The WaterStore recommends supplying each person and each pet in the household with at least three days’ worth of water. FEMA recommends that each person in the household store at least one gallon of water per day. Unopened commercial bottled water is the safest and most reliable water supply. If the water was purchased over the counter, check the expiration date. Plastic bag and container You can wrap fresh food such as cookies and put it in a sealed container, so be sure to have a plastic bag handy. FEMA. Paper Plates, Cups, Disposable Wiping If you don’t have enough electricity or water, have a paper plate or wipe to help you prepare and eat safely. Think of babies and pets. Don’t forget when preparing. Babies and pets in the house. Be sure to have enough prescriptions for your baby, as well as diapers and other items that your baby may need. Also, medicines and non-perishable foods (some snacks are available as storms can be stressful) Sanitary supplies Make sure you have the sanitary supplies you need. Women’s items, toilet paper, wet wipes, paper towels, hand sanitizers and more. Emergency Kit It’s always a good idea to have a disaster kit in a portable container near the exit of your house. These should include non-perishable food and a 3-day water supply, a battery-powered radio and flashlight, spare batteries, and the first battery. -First aid kit with manual, sanitary goods, match in waterproof container, whistle for help if needed, clothing, blanket, sleeping bag, identification card, credit card, cash, paper, pencil, baby cover pet Special items such as medicines, contact lenses, glasses, hearing aids, baby activities and more. As the COVID-19 pandemic continues, it is necessary to include a face mask and so on. Know about refrigerator items. It is important not to panic. When buying a refrigerator and trying to fill it up, Sands says, “How can this food be stored in the absence of electricity?” According to Sands, hoarding extra groceries can not only waste food, but can hurt others who may not be able to find what they are looking for. In the event of a power outage, keep the refrigerator and freezer doors closed as much as possible. You can prevent the cold air from coming out. According to Ready.gov, the refrigerator can keep food cold for about 4 hours if unopened. Discard all fresh foods left at temperatures above 40 degrees Fahrenheit, such as meat, chicken, eggs and leftovers. During a winter storm that fills the gas tank, try to minimize movement as much as possible to avoid getting stuck on the road. According to Sands, if you need to go out, make sure your petrol is full. It’s also a good idea to have an emergency kit on each family vehicle in case you get stuck. Tips to Remember Before the Storm • Make sure you have access to important documents such as home and renter insurance, social security cards, birth certificates and passports when evacuating. • Develop a family communication plan on how to get in touch if you are away during a storm. • Do not bring portable generators, camping stoves or grills into your home. Keep at least 20 feet away from windows, doors, and vents to prevent carbon monoxide poisoning. • Be aware of signs of frostbite and hypothermia. • Plan to check neighbors and friends of the elderly and disabled.

Related video above: grocery shelves exposed due to snowstorm shopping and supply chain issues

Powerful winter storms threaten parts of the eastern United States with devastating icy rain, sleet, and snow, as experts urge Americans to prepare.

Make sure you’ve completed the basics: Learn how to prevent the pipe from freezing (for example, open the cabinet under a sink to heat it up or drip a faucet) Can), test smoke alarms and carbon monoxide detectors and prepare extras for radio and flashlight batteries, charging electronic devices, medicine, etc. to identify everyone in the home Consider your needs.

And make sure you have all the groceries you need.

These types of storms, and their aftermath, can disrupt heat, power, or communication services. It is not yet known how serious the impact will be and how long it will last. Also, provide everyone with at least three days’ worth of food and water in a supply chain problem that could make grocery shopping worse this weekend. At home, Joann Sands, a clinical assistant professor at the Buffalo University School of Nursing, says he is training students in preparing for disasters and emergencies.

Choose groceries that have a long shelf life, do not require cooking, and are not salty or spicy. These foods mean that you are more likely to drink more water.Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommendation..

This should ensure that you stock up in your home.

High-protein, non-perishable food

According to Sands, these include foods such as energy bars, protein bars and fruit bars that do not require refrigeration or freezing.

It’s also a good idea to have dried cereals, granola, peanut butter, dried fruits, and pasteurized milk that won’t spoil when you’re looking around.

canning

Keep in mind that when a storm hits your area, you may lose power, so you can open a manual can opener as well as canned meat, fruits, vegetables and canned juice that you can eat right away with you. Please have Ready.gov..

Canned diet foods, juices and soups can be especially useful for the elderly and sick. according to To the Federal Emergency Management Agency.

If the can swells, dents, or corrodes, do not eat from the can.

Cooking that makes you feel relieved when you eat

Although not required, experts recommend having comfortable and stressful food at hand as you survive the storm.

water

The CDC recommends storing at least three days’ worth of water for each person and pet in the household. FEMA recommendation Store at least 1 gallon of water for each person in the household each day.

Unopened commercial bottled water is the safest and most reliable water supply, officials say. If the water was purchased at the store, check the expiration date.

Plastic bags and containers

According to FEMA, you can wrap fresh food such as cookies in it and put it in a sealed container, so keep a plastic bag handy.

Paper plates, cups, disposable utensils

If you’re short on electricity or water, you can safely prepare and eat meals with paper plates and utensils, CDC says.

Think of babies and pets

When preparing, don’t forget your baby or pet in the house.

Make sure you have enough milk powder, diapers, and other things your baby may need, according to Sands.

Make sure you have a few days’ worth of supplies for your pet, such as medicine and non-perishable food.

(And there are probably some treats, as storms can be stressful for them too.)

Sanitary products

Make sure you have all the hygiene you need, including feminine supplies, toilet paper, wet wipes, paper towels, and hand sanitizers.

Have an emergency kit

It’s always a good idea to have a disaster kit in a portable container near the exit of your house.

They include non-perishable food and a three-day water supply, battery-powered radios and flashlights, spare batteries, first aid kits with manuals, sanitary supplies, matches in waterproof containers, and signaling whistles. Must be. As needed, clothing, blankets, sleeping bags, identification cards, credit cards, cash, paper, pencils, items to meet the needs of babies and pets, medicines, contact lenses, glasses, first aid kits, young children.

As the COVID-19 pandemic continues, it is necessary to include a face mask and so on.

Know this about the items in the fridge:

According to Sands, it’s important not to panic. Buy a fridge and try to fill it up.

“How can I store this food without power?” Sands said hoarding extra groceries could not only waste food, but couldn’t find what he was looking for. He added that it could hurt others.

In the event of a power outage, keep the refrigerator and freezer doors closed as much as possible to prevent cold air from coming out. According to Ready.gov, the refrigerator can keep food cold for about 4 hours if unopened.

Discard all fresh foods that have been left for more than 2 hours at temperatures above 40 degrees Fahrenheit, such as meat, chicken, eggs and leftovers.

Fill the gas tank

During winter storms, try to minimize travel as much as possible to avoid getting stuck on the road. According to Sands, if you need to go out, make sure the gas tank is full.

It’s also a good idea to have an emergency kit in each of your family’s cars in case you get stuck.

Tips to remember before the storm

• According to Sands, make important documents such as home insurance, lessor insurance, social security cards, birth certificates and passports readily available when evacuating.

• Develop a family communication plan on how to get in touch if you are away during a storm.

• Do not bring portable generators, camping stoves or grills into your home. Keep at least 20 feet away from windows, doors, and vents to prevent carbon monoxide poisoning.

• Be aware of signs of frostbite and hypothermia.

• Plan to check neighbors and friends of the elderly and disabled.

Ahead of a winter storm, these are the grocery items you should have in stock Source link Ahead of a winter storm, these are the grocery items you should have in stock

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