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Agriculture revolution explores new approach to farming

The heart of the United States has long been fertile growth grown for crops used throughout the country. Old technology has helped cultivate land for generations. Some growers swear there is a better way: regenerated agriculture. All growers want to grow better crops and healthier animals. And they want to make more money. All this is basically happening due to a small group of abandoned Oklahoma ranchers and decades of tradition. At the entrance to his vast West Oklahoma Ranch, not far from the Texas border, Jimmy Emmons posted his favorite: “Let the soil live longer. Everything Emmons does is make the soil healthier. With an emphasis on, he adheres to generations of family farming traditions to do so. Emmons truly believes in regenerative farming. A small but growing movement is a state. He said it should be the future of agriculture in the United States. Since changing his approach, he has grown better crops, used less water, ran more cows, and Most importantly, make more money. The basic idea. Among them: Stop cultivating and cultivating and use plant-covered crops instead. “As here, this is a sponge It’s made like this, “he said. Emmons calls cover crops “armor” to protect the soil. “So we harvest the crops,” he said. 39 years ago, Emmons and his wife, Ginger, grew wheat and a little alfalfa. Currently, they are rotating 14 different crops. Diversity is another principle of reproduction. It’s good for the soil, but it’s also good for reducing financial risks. “So if you put all the eggs in one basket and drop them, the eggs will be gone,” he said. “But if you have twelve baskets, I’m not going to drop them all.” Emmons is now recommending other ranchers to check out reclaimed farming. But in reality, persuading someone to abandon the farming techniques taught by their father or grandfather is not as easy as it sounds. Hugh Arjo, director of Producer Relations at the Noble Institute, said. “Then,’How is it different from what I’m already doing?'” Arjo is one of the people trying to spread the word. He said less than 5% of Oklahoma producers practice regeneration technology, despite the success of the Ardmore-based Noble Institute. Let’s see how the grass grows. Take a shovel and dig a little to find out what’s going on under the soil. “When they look under the soil, they actually start to see what their practices are doing,” said Jim Johnson, a consultant at the Noble Institute. IT actually has the smell of fresh, clean soil. Johnson discussed yet another principle of regeneration on this trip to Emmons Ranch. It is to introduce animals into the system. There is a lot of weed pressure, insect pressure, disease pressure. That variety helps all, “he said. According to Johnson, these regeneration principles are added to produce higher yields and better quality while using some of the water that traditional ranchers rely on. As the population grows and the climate changes, pressure will be placed on Oklahoma producers. Emmons and Johnson believe that regenerative agriculture is the solution. Agriculture is not the same as organic farming. Emon and others practicing regenerative farming still use chemicals such as fertilizers and pesticides. However, by using these principles, the idea is that these chemicals are less needed and can save costs by reducing their usage.

The heart of the United States has long been fertile growth grown for crops used throughout the country.

Old technology has helped cultivate land for generations.

Some growers swear there is a better way: regenerated agriculture.

All growers want to grow better crops and healthier animals. And they want to make more money. All this is happening because of a small group of Oklahoma ranchers who have basically abandoned their plows, and decades of tradition.

At the entrance to the vast West Oklahoma Ranch, not far from the Texas border, Jimmy Emmons posted his favorite saying: Long Live the Soil.

Everything Emmons does focuses on making his soil healthier, and he goes beyond the generations of family farming traditions to do that.

“They did their best with the technology they had, and I think we should do our best with the technology we have,” he said.

Emmons truly believes in regenerative agriculture. He said the small but growing movement should be the future of state agriculture.

Since changing his approach, he has said he grows better crops, uses less water, grazes more cows, and most importantly makes more money.

“There must be a better way, and I think we’ve found it,” he said.

Regenerative agriculture follows some basic principles. Among them: Stop farming and farming and use plant-covered crops instead. Keep live roots on the ground as much as possible.

“Looking here, it’s made like a sponge,” he said.

Emmons calls cover crops “armor” to protect the soil.

“So we harvest the crop, then plant another cover, and continue to protect it-armor-roots living on the ground to feed the biology,” he said.

39 years ago, Emmons and his wife, Ginger, grew wheat and a little alfalfa. Currently, they are rotating 14 different crops. Diversity is another principle of reproduction. Good for soil, but also good for limiting financial risks.

“That is, if you put all the eggs in one basket and drop them, there are no eggs,” he said. “But if you have twelve baskets, you don’t drop them all.”

Emmons is currently encouraging other ranchers to check for reclaimed farming. But in reality, persuading someone to abandon the farming techniques taught by their father or grandfather is not as easy as it sounds.

“The first question I get is” what is it? ” Hugh Arjo, director of Producer Relations at the Noble Institute, said. “Then,’How is it different from what I’m already doing?’

Arjo is one of the people trying to spread the word. He said less than 5% of Oklahoma producers practice regeneration technology, despite the success of the Ardmore-based Noble Institute.

“We are looking at livestock. We will see how the grass grows. Take a shovel and dig a little to see what is happening under the soil. And they Looking under the soil, they actually start to see what their practices are doing, “he said.

Jim Johnson, a consultant at the Noble Institute, picked up a lump of soil and said: IT actually has a fresh, clean, earthy odor. “

On this trip to Emmons Ranch, Johnson was there to discuss yet another principle of regeneration: introducing animals into the system.

“Successful crop rotation and livestock grazing significantly reduces weed pressure, insect pressure, and disease pressure. All of that diversity helps,” he said.

Emmons was grazing his cows in a single large area. Currently, he uses portable fencing to move them daily, grazing 3-5 acres at a time.

According to Johnson, these regeneration principles are added to produce greater yields and better quality while using some of the water that traditional ranchers rely on.

And as the population grows and the climate changes, pressure will be put on catching up with Oklahoma producers.

Emmons and Johnson believe that regenerative agriculture is the solution.

“It sounds awkward, but I always say it: we could really change the world. We really did,” Johnson said.

The important point is that regenerative farming is not the same as organic farming. Emon and others practicing regenerative farming still use chemicals such as fertilizers and pesticides. However, by using these principles, the idea is that these chemicals are less needed and can save costs by reducing their usage.

Agriculture revolution explores new approach to farming Source link Agriculture revolution explores new approach to farming

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