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After July 4 shooting, the ‘Cheers’ of Highland Park has turned into a pillar of support, healing

Barstool on the far left in a Norton restaurant should not be empty. Each week, 88-year-old Stephen Straus fills the venue with his entertaining personality, making quick friendships with guests at the venue in Highland Park, Illinois. “Norton’s is our version of ‘Cheers’ in Highland Park. Everyone knows your name and everyone is welcomed with open arms,” ​​said Courtney Smith Weinberg, who lives two miles away. “My husband Steven and I had a great night at a bar in Norton’s just. A little over a week ago with this amazing guy, Stephen Straus. That night we made a new friend! He shared stories about moving projects body, how he still rides several miles a day, ”she said. “The three of us. I remember how he was alive and well … and he was involved in life as a whole.” Just two days later, Straus and six others were shot dead at a parade on July 4. .Since then the restaurant that brought happiness has been e the support center for young people and adults looking for comfort in despair. ‘My job here is to make people happy’ The hallway between the kitchen, bar and balcony is Israel “Izzy” Velez. It is part of the bar, the server server and the occasional filling manager. But Velez prefers a simpler job description: “My job here is to make people happy.” That night, his work was needed more than ever. Today is the day the staff and the private sector learned of Straus’ death. Also Wednesday – the night Straus and Velez will be caught under a Chicago sports car covering a brick wall. The old friend should stay. “It’s hard,” Velez said, echoing the sentiments. “He’s a very, very good man.” But then Velez quickly put himself together. He wanted to give customers comfort – a safe haven from the grief that covers the city. “I have to make my face happy,” he said. From all over the restaurant, he began to greet customers. “That’s Michael. That’s it. Bobby,” he said, as he moved his hand to another corner. And soon off, it reunites those who need an old-fashioned style or Corona, burger “Norton” or a ribbon – and the warmth of a well-known brand. For healing, support must go both ways Jonathon Levin and his daughter, Becca, wanted to approach the attack center – not to see abandoned lawn chairs and abandoned strollers who destroying the place where the crime took place, but to support the incident. business close. “We didn’t know what was opening or not. So we actually said, ‘Let’s go up to Norton’s and see what’s open because everything is blocked,'” Levin said. “When we saw it open, we said, ‘We have to come here, we have to support our community, we have to be here.’ he washed it as he approached the area where many people were killed. ” As a resident, it was scary. It’s a pity. But we must continue. We have to move forward, “Levin said.” And part of the progress is to embrace everyone, support everyone, and encourage everyone one step at a time. “Video above: Police answer questions about and the fourth shooting of July’You probably have shoes you can get into ‘On the porch of Norton a few blocks from the massacre, Maya Stolarsky is celebrating her 15th birthday. She lives in Deerfield nearby, but her family has a deep connection to Highland Park.Her mother, Amy, grew up here, her younger sister, Eden,, 12., wants to go to a pancake house in town now that the police have surrounded the restaurant.-Guns automatically at on social gatherings full of families. Tragedy makes Maya doubt about going to public places – or parades, shops or theaters. it. It will always be in my heart. ” Shortly after Monday’s massacre that left several people injured, Amy Stolarsky knew it was time to give her daughters some serious advice on how to attend public meetings. “What did I say?” Stolarsky asked. her daughters at the table. “To always make sure you have shoes that you can get into,” Maya said. Stolarsky never thought of giving the girls that advice. loudly, “she said. girls must be prepared for any situation.Eden, the 12-year-old, says she understands the importance of being cautious, but she will not live her life in fear.In fact, Eden has already thought of going to Highland Park’s fourth of July next year – “to be in one place and support the community.” wipes sit in front of The Art Center.For weeks, residents of Highland Park have passed the exhibition, which opened last month., and mourned the victims of indiscriminate killings across the country. thinking such a terror would happen soon at home.But a terrible attack The North Chicago neighborhood reaffirms that no American community has survived. ” When you see these kinds of things happen, especially shooting people, I keep thinking: ‘This is going to be the end. This article will end. this cycle, ” Stolarsky said after Maya blew a candle on her sundae birthday. “And it hasn’t happened yet. I’m still waiting for that to happen.”

The far left bar at the Norton Restaurant should not be empty.

Each week, 88-year-old Stephen Straus fills the venue with his entertaining personality, quickly making friends with guests at a game in Highland Park, Illinois.

“Norton’s is our version”Welcome back‘in Highland Park. Everyone knows your name and everyone is welcome, ”said Courtney Smith Weinberg, who lives two miles away.

“My husband Steven and I had a great night at a bar in Norton a week ago with this amazing man, Stephen Straus. That night we made a new friend! He shared stories about sports activities, how to now he rides. a motorcycle several miles a day, “she said.

“The three of us laughed together as we ate and drank. I remember how happy he was to be alive … and totally engaged in life.”

Just two days later, Straus and six other people were shot dead at a July 4 parade in some areas.

Since then, the restaurant where it has brought so much happiness has become a support center for young and old who are looking for comfort in despair.

‘My job here is to please people’

The gap between the kitchen, bar and balcony is Israel “Izzy” Velez. It is part of the bar, the server server and the occasional filling manager. But Velez prefers a simpler job description:

“My job here is to make people happy.”

That night, his work was needed more than ever. The day staff and the private sector learned of Straus’ death.

It’s also Wednesday – a night that Straus and Velez will usually encounter under the guise of Chicago sportswear that covers a brick wall.

Velez looked at the empty bartool where his friend should be sitting.

“It’s hard,” Velez said, echoing the sentiments. “He’s a very nice and nice guy.”

But then Velez quickly joined himself. He wanted to give his customers a feeling of well-being – a friendly refuge from the grief that enveloped the city.

“I have to put on a happy face,” he said.

From all over the restaurant began to greet customers.

“That’s Michael. That’s Bobby,” he said, as he raised his hand to another corner.

And soon it is gone, reconnecting with those who need an old-fashioned style or Corona, burger “Norton” or rib plate – the warmth of a familiar face.

For healing, support must go through two channels

Jonathon Levin and his daughter, Becca, wanted to get closer to the scene of the attack – not to see the overturned lawn chairs and abandoned strollers that occupied the scene of the attack, but to support affected businesses nearby.

“We didn’t know what was opening or not. So we actually said, ‘Let’s drive to Norton and see what opens because everything is blocked,'” Levin said.

“When we saw it open, we said, ‘We have to come here, we have to support our community, we have to be here.

Although Levin visited Norton several times, a bad weather washed him away as he approached an area where many people had been killed.

“As a resident, it’s scary. It’s sad. But we have to keep going. We have to keep going,” Levin said. “And part of the development is to embrace everyone, support everyone, and encourage everyone one step at a time.”

Video above: Police answer questions about the parade shooting on July 4

‘Make sure you have shoes that you can wear’

In the courtyard of Norton a few yards from the massacre site, Maya Stolarsky celebrates her 15th birthday.

She lives near Deerfield, but her family has a deep connection to Highland Park. Maya’s mother, Amy, grew up here. Her sister, Eden, 12, wants to go to a pancake house in town now that she is surrounded by police records.

Near the desired restaurant, where a gunman, climbed to the top of the roof, sprayed a bullet from a large automatic rifle on a crowd of families.

Tragedy leaves Maya in doubt about going to public places – whether bars, shops or parties.

“He’s going to be insecure,” the teenager said. “Of course I’ll think about it. It will always be in my heart.”

Shortly after Monday’s massacre, which also left several people injured, Amy Stolarsky knew it was time to give her daughters some serious advice on how to attend public meetings.

“What am I saying?” Stolarsky asked her daughters at the table.

“To always make sure you have shoes that you can wear,” Maya replied.

Stolarsky never thought of giving the girls that advice. “It was disgusting that I felt like I had to say it out loud,” she said.

The video above: Here is how to cope with mental health, anxiety related to anxiety

But if a parade full of families and children could turn into a massacre, her daughters must be prepared for any kind of situation.

Eden, 12, says she understands the importance of being cautious. But she will not live her life in fear.

In fact, Eden is already thinking of going to Highland Park for the fourth of July next year – “to stay in one place and support” the community.

Residents of Highland Park mourn the loss of others as a result of public shootings … and now theirs is their own.

A few from Norton’s, a memorial honoring victims of gun violence sits in front of the Technology Center.

Weeks later, residents of Highland Park passed by the exhibition, which opened last month, and mourned the victims of the massacre across the country.

No one thought such a panic would happen immediately at home. But a deadly attack in a neighborhood of north Chicago once again proves that no American community is safe.

“When you see these things happening, especially with public shootings, I keep thinking: ‘This is going to be the end. This story is going to end this cycle,'” Stolarsky said after Maya’s release. candle on her birthday.

“And it still hasn’t happened. I’m still waiting for it to happen.”

After July 4 shooting, the ‘Cheers’ of Highland Park has turned into a pillar of support, healing Source link After July 4 shooting, the ‘Cheers’ of Highland Park has turned into a pillar of support, healing

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