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A WWII Marine’s remains were returned home 78 years after his death

The remains of the fallen World War II Marines were finally returned to Nebraska. John Paul “Jack” Langan was killed in one of the bloodiest battles in the Pacific. Like many of his fellow soldiers, his body was never identified, but 78 years after his death, his family had the opportunity to say goodbye. His nephew, also known as Jack Langan, was named after his uncle. He, his brother Paul, sisters Teresa, Marguerite, and Mary are the closest surviving relatives. Paul was three years old when his uncle died. .. In November 1943, senior soldier John Paul “Jack” Langan was involved in a fierce battle during the invasion of Betio at Tarawa Atoll. His last action was to help fellow Marines. When I defeated the soldier and stood up, I was hit by a mechanical gun fire, “said his nephew. Langan was hurriedly buried by a fellow Marine. His body was not identified. According to records, he was buried in column D of Cemetery 33 on Betio Island. The line was not found. On October 7, 1949, the Military Review Board declared his body “unrecoverable.” But in 2019, the Historical Flight Defense POW / MIA Treasurer discovered the tomb. A non-profit organization recovered the remains and identified 32 soldiers, including Langan. At Patrick’s Cemetery in St. Joseph near Platte Center, Nebraska, Marine Corps Honorary Guards laid Langan next to his mother and two brothers. It was a bittersweet moment for Paul Langan. “I’m happy, but I miss the time we were together. He may have been an uncle,” he said. Mary Langan said she was deeply moved by the support and awe presented by everyone. Experience. ” Three-volley salutes and faucets echoed in the graveyard when the American flag hung on the casket was presented to the family. “He was a hero. I’m proud of him and I’m glad he’s back,” Paul Langan said.

The remains of the fallen World War II Marines were finally returned to Nebraska.

John Paul “Jack” Langan was killed in one of the bloodiest battles in the Pacific. Like many of his fellow soldiers, his body was never identified.

But 78 years after his death, his family had the opportunity to say goodbye.

He was only 17 years old when he joined the effort to fight for his country.

“He was under the age of 18, so he needed special permission to get in,” said his nephew, also known as Jack Langan.

Langan is named after his uncle. He, his brother Paul and sisters Teresa, Marguerite and Mary are the closest surviving relatives.

Paul was three years old when his uncle died.

“I was able to see Uncle Jack in the lockers of our house in Columbus. I was really small,” said Paul Langan.

World War II & # x20; Marine & # x20; Killed & # x20; at & # x20; Action & # x20; Return & # x20; Home

Courtesy U.S. military

Marine Private John Paul “Jack” Langan

In November 1943, senior soldier John Paul “Jack” Langan was involved in a fierce battle during the invasion of Betio at Tarawa Atoll.

His last action was to try to help a fellow Marine.

“He volunteered to drink water to the pinned soldiers, and when he stood up, he was hit by a machine gun fire,” his nephew said.

Langan was hurriedly buried by his fellow Marines. His body was not identified. According to records, he was buried in column D of Cemetery 33 on Betio Island.

The line was not found. On October 7, 1949, the Military Review Board declared his body “irreparable.”

However, in 2019, the Historical Flight Defense POW / MIA Treasurer discovered the tomb.

History & # x20; Flying & # x20; Archaeologist & # x20; At & # x20; Betio & # x20; Tomb & # x20; Site

A non-profit organization recovered the remains and identified 32 soldiers, including Langan.

“When I found them found the bones, it was like’what a thing’. Years later, it brought tears to my eyes,” said Teresa Hadad.

At Patrick’s Cemetery in St. Joseph near Platte Center, Nebraska, Marine Corps Honorary Guards laid Langan next to his mother and two brothers.

It was a bittersweet moment for Paul Langan.

“I’m happy, but I miss the time we should have been together. He may have been an uncle,” he said.

Mary Langan said she was deeply moved by the support and awe of everyone.

“It was a really moving experience,” she said.

When the American flag hung on the casket was presented to the family, three volley salutes and faucets echoed in the graveyard.

“He was a hero. I’m proud of him and happy he’s back,” said Paul Langan.

A WWII Marine’s remains were returned home 78 years after his death Source link A WWII Marine’s remains were returned home 78 years after his death

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