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A Call for Community Healing: Black Participation in Alzheimer’s Research  – Los Angeles Sentinel | Los Angeles Sentinel

Doris Molina-Henry is an Assistant Professor of Research Neurology at Keck Medical School (courtesy of the Molina-Henry Office)

The AHEAD study is the first known research project that involves participants under the age of 55 and customizes treatment based on the patient’s amyloid level. In order to improve health within underrepresented groups, there is a call for community participation.

Doris Molina-Henry is an Assistant Professor of Research Neurology at Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California. In addition, she is a member of the USC’s Alzheimer’s Institute for Therapeutic Research and has dedicated her energy to the AHEAD Research Collection Section.

The Assistant Professor of Neurology defines the severity of Alzheimer’s disease, saying: “This is what we call neurodegenerative disease – a disease that causes the brain to degenerate over time to change over time to the point in which some of the basic functions that your brain can perform and perform very normally become effective, this is very different from what happens with normal aging. “

Molina-Henry continued: “As you get older, you may usually have some changes in your thinking speed, you may have some changes in your memory that you have made, you may tend to forget some things more easily. But in Alzheimer’s disease, these changes are much more pronounced. And they can have such an impact that they affect your daily function.

Dr. Molina-Henry holds a PhD in Neurobiology and Anatomy from Wake Forest University Health Sciences. Her dissertation emphasizes the role of trophic factors in “age-related” brain functions. She is the author of publications on the influence of growth hormone and its changes in synaptic transmission.

With a variety of experiences, Dr. Molina-Henry grew up in a household that celebrated her African-Caribbean and Latino culture. Her father is struggling with a degenerative condition of the spine, she feels the sensitivity behind poorly represented family households that defend a lifestyle with physical challenges.

In an exclusive interview with the Los Angeles Sentinel, Dr. Molina-Henry revealed the urgent need for health care for the black community. Molina-Henry’s office shared alarming statistics:

  • Adult blacks and African Americans in the United States are twice as likely to develop Alzheimer’s disease as non-Hispanic white adults.
  • The black community is significantly underrepresented in medical research, accounting for less than nine percent of trials.

“I think the simplest statistic we usually share when we think about it is that African Americans, black individuals in our communities, are twice as likely as whites in general to develop Alzheimer’s disease. “Sometimes they get affected earlier and they get affected more aggressively,” Molina-Henry said.

Dr Molina-Henry shared another important factor affecting the black community, “They [Black Community] tend to be diagnosed less frequently, and this may be due to the fact that people perceive this as a condition that is normal for aging at times until it progresses significantly. “

Fighting these chances is the AHEAD study, Molina-Henry developed the ingredients in the production of this study. The AHEAD project is designed to determine whether alleviating AHEAD disease can prevent future memory loss and dementia.

Molina-Henry also outlined the preventive measures one can take to prevent degenerative symptoms: “By making changes in your life early enough, you may be able to compensate when the disease occurs – much of this research is still ongoing. and we find that they do have an impact, ”said Dr. Molina-Henry.

In full transparency, Dr. Molina-Henry shared the gray areas of the study, saying: “In some respects, we still do not know what exactly is what essentially prevents treatment, cures the disease. Of course, there are other pathways where treatments are already becoming available, there is a lot of work being done diligently by a number of different research groups to find ways to tackle the disease from different angles.

Molina-Henry has looked at all aspects of mental health research. Her previous work in this area has included research into the relationship between sleep and the mind’s ability to alleviate dementia.

In this proactive study, AHEAD was funded by the National Institutes of Health and Eisai, Inc. It tests whether it is a “research treatment”, the removal of amyloid from the brain; to slow down any brain changes in people who may be predisposed to Alzheimer’s disease.

The AHEAD study is looking for healthy adults between the ages of 55-80 and participants from different walks of life to find a solution to a healthier world. Visit AHEADStudy.org to learn more.

A Call for Community Healing: Black Participation in Alzheimer’s Research  – Los Angeles Sentinel | Los Angeles Sentinel Source link A Call for Community Healing: Black Participation in Alzheimer’s Research  – Los Angeles Sentinel | Los Angeles Sentinel

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