Local

4th case suspected in Sacramento County, 30 get vaccine

A fourth suspected case of smallpox has been identified in Sacramento County and nearly three dozen close contacts for all cases have been vaccinated, public health officials said Monday. All the cases are connected with the original case that comes from someone who recently traveled to Europe. This case was first reported by a healthcare provider on 21 May. | BELOW VIDEO “Right now the risk to the general public is low, but people still need to be aware of it,” said Sac County Public Health Officer Dr. Sac. Olivia Kasirye in an update. The fourth person was identified last week and the results of the initial tests appeared on Friday. The case has yet to be confirmed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Sacramento County waited to notify the public until it first notified the individual, the California Department of Public Health and the CDC. Anyone with suspected or confirmed smallpox cases has mild illnesses and stays at home, Kasirye said. Thirty close contacts have received a monkeypox vaccine, which must be ordered by the CDC, county officials said. Symptoms of smallpox include fever, headache, muscle aches, back pain, swollen lymph nodes, chills and exhaustion. The patient may also develop a rash days later that often begins on the face and spreads to other parts of the body. May cause damage. The illness can last anywhere from two to four weeks. Some people only show the rash as their first symptom ABOUT Doctors discuss facts about monkey pox amid Sacramento County’s second suspected case, Kasirye said at least three weeks before officials learn there are no new cases. Monkey pox virus can be transmitted when a person comes in contact with an animal, human or material such as clothing or bedding contaminated with the virus. The virus can enter the body through the broken skin of a lesion, the airway, or the mucous membranes, which include the eyes, mouth, and nose. Kasirye stressed that smallpox is not as contagious as COVID-19. For example, there must be at least three hours of contact with someone in the same area to be considered exposed, he said. Monkey pox was first identified in 1958 and is mostly found in Central and West African countries. There have been occasional cases in the United States, including one in 2003 in Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Missouri, Ohio and Wisconsin from imported prairie dogs that had confirmed 47 and possible cases. As of June 3, there have been 25 cases in the United States of monkey pox or orthopedic virus, the family of viruses that includes monkey pox, from the current outbreak. The increase in COVID-19 may be “slowing down” but highly contagious circulations are circulating and can cause re-infections. In the same update, Kasirye said COVID-19 cases continue to rise in the county, but the peak may be near. “There are some indications that there may be a slowdown, but it is too early to say,” he said. “We know that this latest wave is caused by subvariables.” Cases and hospitalizations are nowhere near the peak since January, he said. As of Wednesday, there were 36.1 cases per 100,000 people, up from 253 in January. Hospitals number 150 people with COVID-19, compared to more than 600 at the height of the little boy’s outbreak. However, health officials said increased travel and more contagious variations could affect COVID-19 levels by summer. The BA.2 sub-variant was the dominant strain, but last week BA.2.12 and BA2.12.1 went up, health officials said. “For the general public, the difference is that the latest subtypes tend to be more contagious and a reminder that humans can become infected again,” Kasirye said. Infections follow similar patterns in demographics and postal codes, although there was a “slight increase” last month in whites and Asians, as well as in people aged 34-50, said epidemiological program director Jamie White. Kasirye went on to “strongly recommend” that people wear masks in public and said vaccines “are our best protection”. Businesses can also choose to require a mask, especially if they interact with the public or have cases at work, he said. County health officials said they were following state instructions and had not ordered a mask.

A fourth suspected case of smallpox has been identified in Sacramento County and nearly three dozen close contacts for all cases have been vaccinated, public health officials said Monday.

All cases are linked to the original case coming from someone who had recently traveled to Europe. This case was first reported by a healthcare provider on 21 May.

| BELOW VIDEO Sac County Public Health Officer Explains Detection of Monkey Smallpox Contacts

“Right now the risk to the general public is low, but people still need to be aware,” Public Health Officer Dr Olivia Kasirye said in a statement.

The fourth person was identified last week and the results of the initial tests appeared on Friday. The case has yet to be confirmed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Sacramento County waited to notify the public until it first notified the individual, the California Department of Public Health and the CDC.

Anyone with suspected or confirmed smallpox cases has mild illnesses and stays at home, Kasirye said.

Thirty close contacts have received a monkeypox vaccine, which must be ordered by the CDC, county officials said.

Symptoms of smallpox include fever, headache, muscle aches, back pain, swollen lymph nodes, chills and exhaustion. The patient may also develop a rash days later that often begins on the face and spreads to other parts of the body. May cause damage. The illness can last anywhere from two to four weeks. Some people develop the rash only as their first symptom.

| ABOUT Doctors discuss monkey pox facts amid second suspected Sacramento county case

Kasirye said that every time someone identifies with the virus, they start the process of detecting contacts again, which means that it can take at least another three weeks before officials find out that there are no new cases.

Monkey pox virus can be transmitted when a person comes in contact with an animal, human or material such as clothing or bedding contaminated with the virus. The virus can enter the body through the broken skin of a lesion, the airway, or the mucous membranes, which include the eyes, mouth, and nose.

Kasirye stressed that smallpox is not as contagious as COVID-19. For example, there must be at least three hours of contact with someone in the same area to be considered exposed, he said.

Monkey pox was first identified in 1958 and is found mainly in Central and West African countries.

There have been occasional cases in the United States, including one in 2003 in Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Missouri, Ohio and Wisconsin from imported prairie dogs that had 47 confirmed and potential cases.

From June 3, there are 25 cases in the United States monkey pox or orthopoxvirus, the family of viruses that includes monkey pox, from the current outbreak.

The outbreak of COVID-19 may be “slowing down”, but highly contagious micron variants are circulating and can cause re-infections.

In the same update, Kasirye said COVID-19 cases continue to rise in the county, but the peak may be near.

“There are some indications that there may be a slowdown, but it is too early to say,” he said. “We know that this latest increase is caused by sub-variables.”

Cases and hospitalizations are nowhere near the peak since January, he said.

As of Wednesday, there were 36.1 cases per 100,000 people, up from 253 in January. Hospitals number 150 people with COVID-19, compared to more than 600 at the height of the little boy’s outbreak.

However, health officials said increased travel and more contagious variations could affect COVID-19 levels by summer.

The BA.2 sub-variant was the dominant strain, but last week BA.2.12 and BA2.12.1 went up, health officials said.

“For the general public, the difference is that the latest subtypes tend to be more contagious and a reminder that humans can become infected again,” Kasirye said.

Infections follow similar patterns in demographics and postal codes, although there was a “slight increase” last month in whites and Asians, as well as in people aged 34-50, said epidemiological program director Jamie White.

Kasirye went on to say that he “strongly recommends” that people wear masks in public and that vaccines “are our best protection”.

Businesses can also choose to seek coverage, especially if they interact with the public or have cases at work, he said.

County health officials said they were following state guidelines and had not ordered a mask.

4th case suspected in Sacramento County, 30 get vaccine Source link 4th case suspected in Sacramento County, 30 get vaccine

Related Articles

Back to top button